• In this May 11, 2016 photo, Terumi Tanaka, secretary general of Japan Confederation of A-and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations, speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in Tokyo. The debate over whether U.S. President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Tanaka think: What about his own government? Tanaka was 13 when the U.S. dropped its second atomic bomb on Nagasaki city on Aug. 9, 1945, three days after the first on Hiroshima.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    VOICES: A-bomb survivors leader says Japan shares blame, too

    TOKYO (AP) — The debate over whether President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Terumi Tanaka think: What about his own government?

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • Vietnam veterans Robert Turner, 68, left, and Cliff Stone, 68, both of North Andover, Mass, both of whom said that they oppose President Barack Obama's decision to lift the half-century-old Vietnam arms embargo, pose for a photo at the VFW hall Monday, May 23, 2016, in North Andover, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Many Vietnam vets say they support lifting of arms embargo

    CHICAGO (AP) — The way Terry Neilen sees it, lifting the ban on U.S. arms sales to Vietnam makes sense in the face of China’s growing influence in the region.

  • The Latest: Remains of New Orleans WWII veteran return home

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Latest on the return of the remains of Pvt. Earl Joseph Keating to New Orleans (all times local):

  • In this May 20, 2016 photo, Nadau "du Treil" Michael Keating Jr., left, and his nephew Tyler Lege, go through boxes of photos and letters of Pvt. Earl Joseph Keating, who died more than seven decades ago in World War II, in Metairie, La. Keating's remains are scheduled to be returned to Louisiana on Monday. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    Decades after death in WWII, a son of New Orleans comes home

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than seven decades after being killed during World War II, Pvt. Earl Joseph Keating finally came home to his native New Orleans after his remains were discovered on the Pacific island where he died in 1942.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama arrives on Air Force One at Noi Bai International Airport in Hanoi, Vietnam, Sunday, May 22, 2016. The president is on a weeklong trip to Asia as part of his effort to pay more attention to the region and boost economic and security cooperation. (Hoang Dinh Nam/ Pool Photo via AP)

    Obama looks to boost economic, security ties in Asia

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Barack Obama’s mission in Vietnam and Japan is to build stronger economic and security ties with Asian-Pacific allies anxious about the rise of an increasingly muscular China. That forward-looking message will be delivered even as he confronts the legacies of two wars long past — Vietnam and World War II — that still are fraught with emotion.