• In this undated photo provided the American Bald Eagle Foundation, a bald eagle perches on a tree branch along the Chilkat River within the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve outside Haines, Alaska. The preserve is about 10 miles downstream from a copper and zinc prospect that could someday be developed into a hard rock mine. Critics say a spill from mining operations could harm salmon in the rivers of the preserve, where up to 4,000 eagles gather each winter to feed on the fish after they spawn. (Cheryl McRoberts/American Bald Eagle Foundation via AP)

    Critics question mine exploration near Alaska eagle preserve

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — In early winter, after most tourists have fled Alaska, another kind of visitor flies in: bald eagles, up to 4,000 of them.

  • In this June 16, 2011 file photo, Afeni Shakur appears on the red carpet at the Tupac Shakur 40th Birthday Concert Celebration in Atlanta, Ga. Shakur, the former Black Panther who inspired the work of her son, rap icon Tupac Shakur, and fostered his legacy for decades after he was slain, died Monday, May 2, 2016, of an apparent heart attack, authorities said Tuesday. She was 69. (AP Photo/Ron Harris, File)

    Dear Mama: Afeni Shakur, mother of rapper Tupac Shakur, dies

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Afeni Shakur, the former Black Panther who inspired the work of her son, rap icon Tupac Shakur, and fostered his legacy for decades after he was slain, has died of an apparent heart attack, authorities said Tuesday. She was 69.

  • The Latest: Feds reviewing proposed wolf legislation

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on federal legislation regarding recovery of the endangered Mexican gray wolf (all times local):

  • In this Dec. 7, 2011, file photo, a female Mexican gray wolf is seen at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central N.M. Two U.S. senators from the West have introduced legislation that would push the federal government to work with states to revamp a decades-old recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf. The legislation also calls for the states to assume control if federal officials fail to comply. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)

    2 US senators want states included in wolf management

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Two U.S. senators from the West want state wildlife authorities and ranchers to have more say in how the federal government manages endangered Mexican gray wolves.

  • Kimberlee Stevens, of Middlesex, Vt., holds Peep, a 3-year-old wood duck, at her home Monday, May 2, 2016. Stevens' dog found Peep when it was a chick and brought it home. Vermont wildlife officials tried to take Peep away from Stevens, but the state relented after a public outcry. Last week the state issued the family a permit to keep the duck. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    Vermont family to keep wood duck after state issues permit

    MIDDLESEX, Vt. (AP) — State game officials have backed down and allowed a woman to keep a 3-year-old wood duck that was brought home by one of her dogs when it was a chick.

  • In this March 19, 2015, file photo, elephants walk during a performance of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, in Washington. Ringling Bros. is scheduled to hold its final elephant show during a performance Sunday night, May 1, 2016, in Providence, R.I. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    The Latest: Elephants kick off final Ringling performance

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The Latest on elephants performing for the last time at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus (all times local):

  • Federal, state officials look to protect Pecos River fish

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal and state officials are partnering on a proposal for a $6 million pipeline that would help sustain an endangered species of fish during New Mexico’s extremely dry times.

  • An Asian elephant performs during the national anthem for the final elephant performance during the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, Sunday, May 1, 2016, in Providence, R.I. The circus closes its own chapter on a controversial practice that has entertained audiences since circuses began in America two centuries ago. The animals will live at the Ringling Bros. 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

    Elephants to perform for final time at Ringling Bros. circus

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus bid farewell to its performing elephants on Sunday, as the show closed its own chapter on a practice that has entertained audiences in America for two centuries but has come under fire by animal rights activists.

  • This April 2016 photo provided by Endangered Wolf Center shows Regina Mossotti, director of Animal Care and Conservation at the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka, Mo., administering a checkup on a pup named Vida. Federal wildlife officials say they have, for the first time, successfully integrated wolf pups raised in captivity with a wild litter in New Mexico. (Endangered Wolf Center via AP)

    Captive-born wolf pups released into wild den in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal wildlife officials say they have, for the first time, successfully integrated wolf pups raised in captivity with a wild litter in New Mexico.

  • A worker carries spray bottles of gel fuel to help the burning, as he walks past pyres of ivory that were set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya Saturday, April 30, 2016. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

    Kenya to burn huge pile of ivory tusks to protest poaching

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya’s president set fire Saturday to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement by this East African country against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species.