• Dolphins’ Jordan reinstated by NFL after sitting out 2015

    DAVIE, Fla. (AP) — Miami Dolphins defensive end Dion Jordan’s suspension ended just as training camp began.

    Updated: 12:23 pm

  • Famous cue maker charged with helping smuggle elephant ivory

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A famous custom pool cue maker has been charged in California with helping to smuggle protected elephant ivory by using it on his cues.

  • Chicago Cubs relief pitcher Aroldis Chapman delivers in this multiple exposure photo during the ninth inning of a baseball game against the Chicago White Sox on Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Chicago. Chapman recorded his first save as a Cubs beat the Chicago White Sox 3-1. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Cubs considering new translator for star closer Chapman

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago Cubs are considering bringing in a new Spanish translator for Aroldis Chapman after the star closer from Cuba struggled to answer questions about a past domestic violence case in his introductory news conference.

  • Indian forest officials and wildlife conservationists try to catch a baby Rhino that strayed into an adjacent village following floods at the Kaziranga National Park, east of Gauhati, northeastern Assam state, India, Thursday, July 28, 2016. The Rhino calf was rescued and sent to a conservation center. Forest officials say they have rescued six rhino calves from being washed away by floodwaters that have swamped the national park. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath)

    6 baby rhinos saved from being washed away by India floods

    KAZIRANGA, India (AP) — Wildlife workers have rescued six rhino calves from being washed away by floodwaters that have swamped a national park in northeastern India.

  • Additional samples to test for chronic wasting to be taken

    LONDON, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas Game and Fish Commission biologists plan to take additional samples from deer to search for chronic wasting disease in southern Pope County.

  • This Oct. 1, 2014, file photo shows a black-footed ferret peeking out of a tube after being brought to a ranch near Williams, Ariz. The endangered weasel is returning to an area of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Biologists plan to release 35 black-footed ferrets Tuesday, July 26, 2016, near Meeteetse, Wyo. Scientists thought the black-footed ferret was extinct until a dog brought a dead one home near Meeteetse in 1981. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    MEETEETSE, Wyo. (AP) — A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago.

  • Resident Laurent Lacore, 48, returns to his home near Sand Canyon Road in Santa Clarita, Calif., Monday, July 25, 2016. The majority of some 20,000 people forced from their homes by a wildfire that exploded during the weekend were told they could return home Monday night, though an army of firefighters continued battling flames in the rugged hills and canyons northwest of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

    Homes on edge of the wilderness complicate wildfire efforts

    SANTA CLARITA, Calif. (AP) — When Pat Telleria saw the wind-driven flames sweeping across the grass foothills toward his dream home, he picked up the phone.

  • Think Trump and Clinton fall flat? Vote for Cat in the Hat

    SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — Voters who think presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton fall flat can now choose the Cat in the Hat.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • In this July 20, 2016, photo, Dave Ambrose, left, and Nate Robinnson, right, use shovels to move piles of whelk shells with tiny oysters growing on them on a boat in Little Egg Harbor, N.J. Efforts to restore once-abundant oyster populations are underway throughout the United States, and researchers and volunteers say they are optimistic the small-scale efforts will pave the way for a major comeback of oysters, whose populations have dwindled drastically from levels seen in the 1800s. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    Maturing oyster recovery projects bring calls for money

    LITTLE EGG HARBOR, N.J. (AP) — Oysters were once so abundant in New Jersey that vacationers would clamber off trains, wade into the water and pluck handfuls to roast for dinner. Their colonies piled so high that boats would sometimes run aground on them, and they were incorporated into navigation maps. Even earlier, Native American tribes would have oyster feasts on the banks of coastal inlets.