• Game panel delays decision on Mexican wolf permit appeal

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico Game Commission has delayed a decision on an appeal filed by federal officials who are seeking to release endangered Mexican gray wolves as part of recovery efforts in the Southwest.

  • A Penguin runs out of the ocean after swimming with other penguins at Boulders beach a popular tourist destination in Simon's Town, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015.  The penguins on South Africa's west coast are a big tourist attraction, but their numbers have declined and scientists are still debating whether fishing has helped push the species to the brink of extinction. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

    Scientists squabble while Africa’s only penguins perish

    CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — They’re cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins — the continent’s only species of the flightless bird — are at risk of extinction.

  • In this July 12, 2014 photo, a bow fisherman scans the surface of the Illinois River for Asian carp during the Peoria Flying Fish Festival & Bow Fishing Tournament. While this tournament did not draw complaints, a fishing tournament on the Mississippi drew so many complaints over loud airboats and powerful lights that state and federal regulators decided to consider tighter restrictions on the fast-growing but little-known sport. (Ting Shen/Journal Star via AP)

    Bowfishing tournament in Mississippi River draws complaints

    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — The teams of fishermen arrived with a seemingly unusual array of equipment — loud airboats, powerful searchlights and scores of bows and arrows.

  • Mack Ralbovsky, left, of the Rainforest Reptile Shows, gets assistance from Vermont game wardens Tim Carey, center, and Wes Butler as they remove a reticulated python, between 17 and 18 feet long, from the home of Pat Howard Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, in North Clarendon, Vt. Howard got the female snake and a slightly smaller male on Sunday from a person in New York, but turned them over to game wardens because he doesn't have a license to keep them and they are too big. The wardens sent the snakes to the Rainforest Reptile Shows in Massachusetts, which will care for them. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring) (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    2 homeless pythons given to Vermont man headed to sanctuary

    NORTH CLARENDON, Vt. (AP) — Two giant southeast Asian pythons that were rescued by a long-time snake collector and were turned over to state game wardens are headed to a sanctuary.

  • In this Sept. 19, 2006, file photo, supporters of the football team at Washington High School in Massillon, Ohio, collect donations at the high school's Paul Brown Tiger Stadium to care for a tiger cub leased to serve as the team's mascot, "Obie." The football team has had a live tiger cub mascot at games for decades, but the team's 2015 season may begin without a tiger cub at games unless state officials receive an affidavit required by Ohio's revised wildlife regulations enacted in 2012, attesting tiger cubs leased to serve as mascots will live at an accredited facility and be cared for throughout their lives. (Glenn B. Dettman/The Independent via AP, File)

    Mascot fight between school, Ohio goes down to the wire

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A high school football team that has featured a tiger cub at games for decades might kick off the season without its beloved mascot because of rules implemented after a suicidal man released dozens of dangerous animals in 2011.

  • A fan is helped into a stretcher after being hit with a foul ball off the bat of Detroit Tigers' Anthony Gose, foreground, during the eighth inning of a baseball game against the Texas Rangers at Comerica Park Friday, Aug. 21, 2015, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Duane Burleson)

    Tigers say injured fan released from hospital

    DETROIT (AP) — The Detroit Tigers say the fan who was hit by a foul ball in Friday night’s game was released from the hospital Saturday.

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, July 28, 2015, volunteer Ivette Portela bottle feeds a young fawn at the Kindred Spirits Fawn Rescue in Loomis, Calif.  California's historic drought has caused a scarcity of food in the wild that has been blamed for unusual animal activity.    (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    California drought may exacerbate wildlife-human encounters

    LOOMIS, Calif. (AP) — The scarcity of food in the wild has been blamed for unusual animal activity during California’s drought including a recent bear attack, mountain lion sightings and an uptick in orphaned animals.