• Atomic bomb survivor Kimie Miyamoto, 89, speaks during an interview at a retirement home she shares with other bomb victims, in Hiroshima, Japan, Saturday, May 28, 2016. A-bomb survivors feel both wonder and doubt after U.S. President Barack Obama visited the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on Friday. "The world paid attention to what happened here, even if just for a while, because someone as important as him came to Hiroshima. So perhaps it could make things a little bit better," Miyamoto said of Obama's visit in an interview. "But you never really know if it will make a difference, because so much depends on what other countries are thinking as well." At right is another bomb survivor Michiko Kimoto, 87. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Atomic bomb survivors feel wonder, doubt after Obama visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — The survivors of the world’s first atomic bomb attack are used to hearing grand vows to rid the world of nuclear weapons. They just don’t usually come directly from the leader of the country that dropped the bomb on them in the first place.

  • Text of Obama’s speech at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

    Text of President Barack Obama’s remarks Friday at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park about the U.S. atomic bombing, the legacy of World War II and nuclear weapons, as delivered:

  • UN agency reports Iranian has complied with nuclear deal

    VIENNA (AP) — Iran has corrected one violation of its landmark nuclear deal with six world powers and is honoring all other major obligations, the U.N. atomic energy agency reported Friday.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama hugs Shigeaki Mori, an atomic bomb survivor; creator of the memorial for American WWII POWs killed at Hiroshima, during a ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. Obama on Friday became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the world's first atomic bomb attack, bringing global attention both to survivors and to his unfulfilled vision of a world without nuclear weapons. (AP Photo Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama at Hiroshima: ‘Death fell from the sky’

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — With an unflinching look back at a painful history, President Barack Obama stood on the hallowed ground of Hiroshima on Friday and declared it a fitting place to summon people everywhere to embrace the vision of a world without nuclear weapons.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrive to the Ise Grand Shrine in Ise, Japan during the G-7 Summit on Thursday, May 26, 2016. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Obama defends his nuclear record on eve of Hiroshima visit

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — On the eve of his historic trip to Hiroshima, President Barack Obama is defending the vigor of his efforts to rid the world of nuclear weapons. He says he will use his visit to the Japanese memorial site on Friday to underscore “the sense of urgency that we all should have.”

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the Ujibashi bridge as they visit the Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan Thursday, May 26, 2016 , ahead of the first session of the G-7 summit meetings. When Obama and Abe make a historic visit to Hiroshima - the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited the site of the first atomic bomb attack - their words advocating nuclear disarmament will clash with real-world security necessities. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP)

    Nuclear-free aspirations of Obama, Abe conflict with reality

    TOBA, Japan (AP) — There is the soaring rhetoric. And then there’s the messy reality.