• U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe arrive to the Ise Grand Shrine in Ise, Japan during the G-7 Summit on Thursday, May 26, 2016. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Obama defends his nuclear record on eve of Hiroshima visit

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — On the eve of his historic trip to Hiroshima, President Barack Obama is defending the vigor of his efforts to rid the world of nuclear weapons. He says he will use his visit to the Japanese memorial site on Friday to underscore “the sense of urgency that we all should have.”

  • With the Atomic Bomb Dome as a backdrop, passers-by move past riot police near Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, southwestern Japan, Thursday, May 26, 2016. U.S. President Barack Obama is to visit Hiroshima on Friday, May 27 after the Group of Seven summit in central Japan, becoming the first serving American president to do so. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Obama’s every gesture will be scrutinized in Hiroshima visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Every gesture. Every word uttered or avoided. Every person Barack Obama speaks with, listens to and stands beside in Hiroshima. All of it will help determine the success of a trip with huge potential political and diplomatic pitfalls, both in America and Asia.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the Ujibashi bridge as they visit the Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan Thursday, May 26, 2016 , ahead of the first session of the G-7 summit meetings. When Obama and Abe make a historic visit to Hiroshima - the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited the site of the first atomic bomb attack - their words advocating nuclear disarmament will clash with real-world security necessities. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP)

    Nuclear-free aspirations of Obama, Abe conflict with reality

    TOBA, Japan (AP) — There is the soaring rhetoric. And then there’s the messy reality.

  • People hold up a sign welcoming President Barack Obama as seen from his motorcade en route Jade Emperor Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Ho Chi Minh City is the second stop on Obama's three-day visit to America's former wartime enemy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama reaches out to people a day after Vietnam arms deal

    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam (AP) — When President Barack Obama met with human rights advocates and other activists Tuesday, he spoke of the “remarkable strides” Vietnam was making on a range of issues. Nguyen Quang A missed the meeting: That morning, the 70-year-old activist said, security men grabbed his arms and legs, threw him in a car and drove him into the countryside, where they held him until Obama left town.