• FILE-German sailors Erik Heil, left, and und Thomas Plößel compete in a 49 class race on the Baltic Sea near Kiel-Schilksee  June 25, 2013. Erik Heil has fallen ill and is getting daily hospital treatment for several infections after competing in polluted water at a test event for next year's Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.(Carsten Rehder/dpa via AP)

    German sailor gets sick after Rio regatta

    FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — A German sailor has fallen ill and is getting daily hospital treatment for several skin infections after competing in polluted water at a test event for next year’s Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

    Updated: 9:52 am

  • In this Aug. 7, 2015, photo scientist Oliver Grah measures the velocity of a stream of glacier melt stemming from Sholes Glacier in one of Mount Baker's slopes in Mount Baker, Wash. Glaciers on Mount Baker and other mountains in the North Cascades are thinning and retreating. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

    Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier

    MOUNT BAKER, Wash. (AP) — Mauri Pelto digs his crampons into the steep icy slope on Mount Baker in Washington state and watches as streams of water cascade off the thick mass of bare, bluish ice. Every 20 yards, the water carves vertical channels in the face of the glacier as it rushes downstream.

    Updated: 9:16 am

  • Thursday, August 27, 2015

    The Latest on TV shooting: AG: We need to quit thinking we can walk away from these tragedies

  • In this June 23, 2015, file photo a lawn is irrigated in Sacramento, Calif. A report is due out Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015 on monthly state water conservation figures. Many California cities are conserving well, and officials are turning their attention to the few cities/agencies that aren’t doing so well. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    California cut water use by 31 percent in July amid drought

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — California cities cut water use by a combined 31 percent in July, exceeding the governor’s statewide mandate to conserve, officials said Thursday.

  • Utility managers push for conservation even as drought eases

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Water managers across New Mexico aren’t giving up on their push for residents to conserve water even though severe drought has disappeared from the state.

  • Athletes from the Nacra 17 Mixed Multihull class return to Flamengo beach after competing in a sailing test event for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. Much of the focus at the Olympic sailing test event has been on Rio's polluted waters. Athletes have little choice but to compete with local organizers declining to move to cleaner venues for next year's first Olympics in South America. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

    Sailing chief: Rio events could be moved from polluted bay

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The head of sailing’s governing body threatened Saturday to move all Olympic sailing events out of polluted Guanabara Bay unless the water is cleaner and floating rubbish is removed for next year’s Rio Games.

  • In this Aug. 12, 2015 file photo, water flows through a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King mine chemical accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo. Internal documents released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday, Aug. 21, show managers at the EPA were aware of the potential for a catastrophic "blowout" at an abandoned mine that could release "large volumes" of wastewater laced with toxic heavy metals. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

    EPA knew of ‘blowout’ risk for tainted water at gold mine

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials knew of the potential for a catastrophic “blowout” of poisonous wastewater from an inactive gold mine, yet appeared to have only a cursory plan to deal with such an event when a government cleanup team triggered a 3-million-gallon spill, according to internal documents released by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  • Employees of Rio de Janeiro's water and sewage utility work on a sewage collection system in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. Head of the utility, Jorge Briard, has acknowledged "problems" with the city's sewage-filled Guanabara Bay but insisted the Olympic city will eventually reach its goal of collecting and treating all the waste currently dumped into the waterway. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Head of Rio’s water utility sees ‘problems’ in Olympic bay

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The head of Rio de Janeiro’s water utility has acknowledged “problems” with the city’s sewage-filled Guanabara Bay but insisted the Olympic city will eventually reach its goal of collecting and treating all the waste currently dumped into the waterway.