• President Barack Obama drinks filtered Flint, Mich. water during a briefing on the response and recovery plans of the ongoing water crisis by the unified command group at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint, Mich., Wednesday, May 4, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama visiting Flint for first time since water crisis began

    FLINT, Mich. (AP) — Sipping filtered city water to show it’s again drinkable, President Barack Obama promised Wednesday to ride herd on leaders at all levels of government until every drop of water flowing into homes in Flint, Michigan, is safe to use.

    Updated: 3:45 pm

  • In this undated photo provided the American Bald Eagle Foundation, a bald eagle perches on a tree branch along the Chilkat River within the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve outside Haines, Alaska. The preserve is about 10 miles downstream from a copper and zinc prospect that could someday be developed into a hard rock mine. Critics say a spill from mining operations could harm salmon in the rivers of the preserve, where up to 4,000 eagles gather each winter to feed on the fish after they spawn. (Cheryl McRoberts/American Bald Eagle Foundation via AP)

    Critics question mine exploration near Alaska eagle preserve

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — In early winter, after most tourists have fled Alaska, another kind of visitor flies in: bald eagles, up to 4,000 of them.

    Updated: 12:30 pm

  • In this Tuesday, April 12, 2016 photo, Sewage flows from an outlet into the sea in front of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City. Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip's Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone. The sewage has damaged Gaza's limited fresh water supplies, decimated fishing zones, and after years of neglect, is now floating northward and affecting Israel as well, where a nearby desalination plant was forced to shut down, apparently due to pollution. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

    Gaza sewage poisons coastline, threatens Israel

    SHATI REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip’s Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone.

  • In this Dec. 9, 2014, photo, golden jellyfish swim in Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Part of a UNESCO World Heritage area, the saltwater lake has long been a source of wonder for tourists, who have delighted in snorkeling among the millions of golden jellyfish which can fill the water as thick as corn chowder. But some tourists in recent weeks have struggled to find even a single jellyfish, prompting at least one tour operator to suspend its trips.(Kevin Davidson via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT, NO SALES

    In Pacific nation of Palau, Jellyfish Lake losing namesake

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The big question at Palau’s Jellyfish Lake: Where are all the jellyfish?

  • Federal, state officials look to protect Pecos River fish

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal and state officials are partnering on a proposal for a $6 million pipeline that would help sustain an endangered species of fish during New Mexico’s extremely dry times.

  • The controlled gate is seen at the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but only five states, including New Jersey, are actively monitoring for the chemicals used in the foam and spilled by other sources. New Jersey officials say they're focused on the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City, where PFCs, known as perfluorinated compounds, have been found in groundwater and in low levels in municipal wells near the center's fire training area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination

    The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat.

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, April  7, 2016, an old man fishes in a lake that connects to the nearby Techa River, near the village of Muslyumovo, Chelyabinsk region, Russia, which is polluted with radioactive waste from Mayak nuclear plant. Mayak has been responsible for at least two of the country’s biggest radioactive accidents. Worse, environmentalists say, is the facility’s decades-old record of using the Arctic-bound waters of the Techa River to dump waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, hundreds of tons of which is imported annually from neighboring nations. (AP Photo/Katherine Jacobsen)

    Russia’s nuclear nightmare flows down radioactive river

    MUSLYUMOVO, Russia (AP) — At first glance, Gilani Dambaev looks like a healthy 60-year-old man and the river flowing past his rural family home appears pristine. But Dambaev is riddled with diseases that his doctors link to a lifetime’s exposure to excessive radiation, and the Geiger counter beeps loudly as a reporter strolls down to the muddy riverbank.

  • New Mexico sues Texas oil company for lease payments

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico State Land Office is suing a Texas-based oil company for years of overdue fees and recent environmental cleanup costs at a waste-water injection well used by various oil producers.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.