• Palestinians chant slogans as they carry the body of Abdel-Fattah al-Sharif, during his funeral, in the West Bank city of Hebron, Saturday, May 28, 2016. Al-Sharif was killed by an Israeli soldier in March while lying on the ground seriously wounded after he and another Palestinian attacked IDF troops.(AP Photo/Nasser Shiyoukhi)

    West Bank buries wounded Palestinian who was killed in March

    HEBRON, West Bank (AP) — Over a thousand people have attended the West Bank funeral of a Palestinian who was shot and killed by an Israeli soldier while he lay wounded after carrying out a stabbing attack on security forces in March.

  • In this May 3, 2016 file photo, World War II veteran Lester Tenney, 95, holds a bamboo stick that he said Japanese soldiers used to beat him while he was held as a prisoner of war, at his home in Carlsbad, Calif. The former Army staff sergeant believes President Barack Obama should keep ex-POWs like him and others in mind when he makes his historic visit to Hiroshima on Friday, May 27. (AP Photo/Julie Watson, File)

    VOICES: Hiroshima serves as memorial for all victims of WWII

    CARLSBAD, Calif. (AP) — The suffering he endured during World War II still haunts 95-year-old Lester Tenney, who has black lung disease from working as a prisoner of war in a Japanese coal mine.

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.