• Brazilian Army soldiers distribute flyers with information on how to combat the Aedes aegypti during the "Burial of the Mosquito" carnival block parade in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. The parade that happens every year during carnival informs residents and tourists about the dangers of the Aedes aegypti and teaches them how to combat the mosquitoes. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    The Latest: Colombia official attributes 3 deaths to Zika

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Latest on efforts to battle the Zika virus (all times local):

  • Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to be tested for various diseases perch inside a container at the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory in Panama City, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Panamanian authorities announced on Monday that 50 cases of the Zika virus infection have been detected in Panama's sparsely populated Guna Yala indigenous area along the Caribbean coast. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is vector for the spread of the Zika virus. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

    The Latest: US, Colombia to team up on Zika research

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Latest on the mosquito-born Zika virus, which is suspected of causing brain deformities in babies (all times local):

  • A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in an open area of a sports facility, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. With no hope for a vaccine to prevent Zika in the near future, authorities are focusing on the most effective way to combat the virus: killing the mosquito that carries it. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil health official confirm Zika spread via transfusion

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Two people in southeastern Brazil contracted the Zika virus through blood transfusions, a municipal health official said Thursday, presenting a fresh challenge to efforts to contain the virus on top of the disclosure of a case of sexual transmission in the United States.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil is not sharing enough samples and disease data to let researchers determine whether the Zika virus is, as feared, linked to the increased number of babies born with abnormally small heads in the South American country, U.N. and U.S. health officials say.

  • Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Castro speaks to the press before attending the Mercosur Health Ministers summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate actions to try and fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. Castro said that efforts are being made to create a vaccine against it. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    APNewsbreak: Few Zika samples being shared by Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — U.N. and U.S. health officials tell The Associated Press that Brazil has yet to share enough samples and disease data needed to answer the most worrying question about the Zika outbreak: whether the virus is actually responsible for the increase in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads in Brazil.

  • A Sucre municipality worker fumigates for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus in the Petare neighborhood of Caracas, Venezuela, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016. Venezuela is reporting a jump in cases of a rare, sometimes paralyzing syndrome that may be linked to the Zika virus. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

    The Latest: Female airline crew can request no Brazil flight

    PARIS (AP) — The Latest on the battle against the Zika virus (all times local):