• President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands after speaking to media in Shima, Japan, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama to wrap up trip to Vietnam by talking to young leaders

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Laying bare the complex politics of reconciliation and contrition, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday rejected the idea of visiting Pearl Harbor to reciprocate for President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Hiroshima later this week. Obama, for his part, said he would use his time in Hiroshima to honor all those killed in World War II and to push for a world without nuclear weapons.

  • A bus moves a migrant family to a government-built camps during a police operation at a makeshift refugee camp at the Greek-Macedonian border near the northern Greek village of Idomeni, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Greek authorities began an operation at dawn Tuesday to gradually evacuate the country's largest informal refugee camp of Idomeni on the Macedonian border, blocking access to the area and sending in more than 400 riot police. (AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • People hold up a sign welcoming President Barack Obama as seen from his motorcade en route Jade Emperor Pagoda in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Ho Chi Minh City is the second stop on Obama's three-day visit to America's former wartime enemy. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama reaches out to people a day after Vietnam arms deal

    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam (AP) — When President Barack Obama met with human rights advocates and other activists Tuesday, he spoke of the “remarkable strides” Vietnam was making on a range of issues. Nguyen Quang A missed the meeting: That morning, the 70-year-old activist said, security men grabbed his arms and legs, threw him in a car and drove him into the countryside, where they held him until Obama left town.

  • Vietnam veterans Robert Turner, 68, left, and Cliff Stone, 68, both of North Andover, Mass, both of whom said that they oppose President Barack Obama's decision to lift the half-century-old Vietnam arms embargo, pose for a photo at the VFW hall Monday, May 23, 2016, in North Andover, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Many Vietnam vets say they support lifting of arms embargo

    CHICAGO (AP) — The way Terry Neilen sees it, lifting the ban on U.S. arms sales to Vietnam makes sense in the face of China’s growing influence in the region.

  • President Barack Obama greets women at the door as he walks from the Bún chả Hương Liên restaurant after having dinner with American Chef Anthony Bourdain, Monday, May 23, 2016,  in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama dining with CNN’s Anthony Bourdain for series

    NEW YORK (AP) — President Barack Obama dined in Hanoi, Vietnam, on Monday with CNN personality Anthony Bourdain, whose “Parts Unknown” food travelogue is one of the network’s most popular nonfiction series.

  • President Barack Obama winks as he arrives for a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, Monday, May 23, 2016, at the International Convention Center in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama lifts decades-old arms ban in his 1st visit to Vietnam

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Eager to banish lingering shadows of the Vietnam War, President Barack Obama lifted the U.S. embargo on selling arms to America’s former enemy Monday and made the case for a more trusting and prosperous relationship going forward. Activists said the president was being too quick to gloss over serious human rights abuses in his push to establish warmer ties.

  • This photo taken by a freelance photographer Abdul Salam Khan using his smart phone on Sunday, May 22, 2016, purports to show the destroyed vehicle in which  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour was traveling in the Ahmad Wal area in Baluchistan province of Pakistan, near Afghanistan's border. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader,  Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, has been killed in a U.S. drone strike. (AP Photo/Abdul Salam Khan)

    Obama: Taliban leader’s death a ‘milestone’ for Afghan peace

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — President Barack Obama said Monday that the violent death of Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour by a U.S. airstrike should send a “clear signal” to anti-American extremists that “we’re going to protect our people.”

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left,  and Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang shake hands at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi, Vietnam, Monday, May 23, 2016. The president is on a weeklong trip to Asia as part of his effort to pay more attention to the region and boost economic and security cooperation. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    The Latest: Obama and Vietnamese leader tout economic ties

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — The Latest on U.S. President Barack Obama’s first visit to Vietnam (all times local):

  • U.S. Navy LT JG Katia Medford-Davis looks from a window of a U.S. Navy Lockheed P-3C Orion patrol aircraft from Sigonella, Sicily, Sunday, May 22, 2016, searching the area in the Mediterranean Sea where the Egyptair flight 804 en route from Paris to Cairo went missing on May 19. Search crews found floating human remains, luggage and seats from the doomed EgyptAir jetliner Friday but face a potentially more complex task in locating bigger pieces of wreckage and the black boxes vital to determining why the plane plunged into the Mediterranean. (AP Photo/Salvatore Cavalli)

    10 Things to Know for Monday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Monday: