• The controlled gate is seen at the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but only five states, including New Jersey, are actively monitoring for the chemicals used in the foam and spilled by other sources. New Jersey officials say they're focused on the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City, where PFCs, known as perfluorinated compounds, have been found in groundwater and in low levels in municipal wells near the center's fire training area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination

    The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.

  • In this Tuesday, April 26, 2016 photo, an elephant opens its mouth while being sprayed water to cool off at Dusit Zoo in Bangkok, Thailand. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke. April in Thailand is typically hot and sweaty but his year's scorching weather has set a record for the longest heat wave in at least 65 years. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thailand is used to hot Aprils, but not this hot!

    BANGKOK (AP) — Animals at Bangkok’s zoo are being fed special frozen fruit pops. People are flocking to shopping malls just to soak up the air-conditioning. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke.

  • Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko lays flowers at a monument to the victims of the Chernobyl tragedy outside the nuclear power plant in Ukraine, Tuesday, April 26, 2016. Ukraine on Tuesday marked the 30th anniversary of the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, the world’s worst nuclear accident. (AP Photo/Sergei Chuzavkov)

    Ukraine marks 30 years since 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster

    KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — As Ukraine and Belarus on Tuesday marked the 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear accident with solemn words and an angry protest, some of the men who were sent to the site in the first chaotic and frightening days were gripped by painful memories.

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks to the media as he meets with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif Friday, April 22, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

    Kerry: US won’t block foreign business deals under nuke deal

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Obama administration moved Friday to try to address Iranian complaints that U.S. financial regulations are denying Iran the sanctions relief it deserves under last year’s landmark nuclear deal.

  • Environmental groups sue over Four Corners power plant, mine

    FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — In a story April 21 about a lawsuit involving the Four Corner Power Plant, The Associated Press reported erroneously the entity that a spokesman for the Navajo Transitional Energy Company was referring to when asked about the possibility of a lawsuit against environmental groups. Erny Zah was referring to the company, not the tribe itself. Zah also said the tribal entity always considers legal action an option but it has no immediate plans to file a lawsuit.