• In this Feb. 26, 2014, file photo, an election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early voting polling site in Austin, Texas. A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, July 20, 2016, that Texas' strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must quickly be scrubbed of those effects before the November 2016 election. Voters will still need to show identification at the polls under the decision by the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, according to attorneys who challenged the law, but a lower court will now also have to devise a way for Texas to accommodate those who cannot. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

    Appeals court: Texas voter ID law discriminates; orders fix

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas’ strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must be weakened before the November elections, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, following claims that at least a half-million registered voters could have struggled to cast a ballot.

  • In this Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, file photo, the JPMorgan Chase & Co. logo is displayed at their headquarters in New York. In a massive policy shift, the Republican Party has adopted a platform position where they advocate for the reinstatement of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933, a Great Depression-era law that regulated the U.S. banking industry until it was repealed in 1999. A passage of Glass-Steagall would cause a break-up of the big banks. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    In surprise, GOP looks to revive Depression-era banking law

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Republican Party has taken a page straight out of the campaign books of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.