• In this Friday, July 22, 2016, photo, Pecha Berry Pokeseed doughnuts, top left and center, are displayed in a box of doughnuts from Doughnut Plant, in New York. From doughnut shops to zoos, businesses and organizations are finding creative ways to capitalize on “Pokemon Go.” (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    Pokemon doughnuts, exercise classes tap game’s popularity.

    NEW YORK (AP) — Weeks into the “Pokemon Go” craze, demand remains strong for “Poke Ball”-shaped treats made by a high-end doughnut company, one of many businesses and organizations coming up with creative ways to lure players in their search for the elusive “pocket monsters.”

  • Czech tourist Pavlina Pizova attends a press conference at a police station in Queenstown, New Zealand, Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. Pizova, whose partner fell to his death, survived a harrowing month in the frozen New Zealand wilderness before being rescued, police said. (James Allan/New Zealand Herald via AP)

    Tourist describes death, harrowing month in New Zealand bush

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Pavlina Pizova says she couldn’t free her partner after he slipped down an icy bank and became wedged between rocks and branches. After he died, she stayed with him through the freezing night.

  • File-This June 3, 2008, file photo shows then presumptive Democratic nominee Sen. Barack Obama being covered in the hands of supporters after a speech in St. Paul, Minn.  This and other Presidential campaign photography captured by The Associated Press over the past century will be on display at Virginia's Longwood University this fall. The exhibition titled "Citizens and Leaders" will coincide with this year's lone vice presidential debate, which the university will host Oct. 4. The exhibition will run from Sept. 9 through Oct. 16 at the Longwood Center for the Visual Arts. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)

    Exhibition: 100 years of AP presidential campaign photos

    FARMVILLE, Va. (AP) — Presidential campaign photography captured by The Associated Press over the past century will be on display at Virginia’s Longwood University this fall.

  • In this Saturday, June 18, 2016, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks by the Sentinel Bridge in the Yosemite Valley in front of Yosemite Falls, the highest waterfall in the park, at Yosemite National Park, Calif. In a new project with National Geographic, Obama becomes the first sitting U.S. president to project himself into virtual reality, in this case, a 360-degree representation of Yosemite National Park. The 11-minute VR video, narrated by Obama, is one part paean to the wonders of America’s national parks and one part warning of the threat posed by climate change. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Yosemite, and President Obama, head into virtual reality

    NEW YORK (AP) — In a new project with National Geographic, Barack Obama becomes the first sitting U.S. president to project himself into virtual reality — in this case, a 360-degree representation of Yosemite National Park.

  • In this photo taken, Aug., 11, 2016, Mickey Munday talks to a reporter in Love Park in North Miami, Fla. When he was one of Miami's notorious "cocaine cowboys" in the 1980s, Mickey Munday made millions of dollars flying loads of drugs for Colombia's Medellin and Cali cartels. He knew infamous Medellin kingpin Pablo Escobar. He liked to fly his illicit cargo to out-of-the-way landing strips in the Everglades using high-tech gadgetry such as night-vision goggles. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    A Miami ‘cocaine cowboy’ finds redemption with love locks

    NORTH MIAMI, Fla. (AP) — When he was one of Miami’s notorious “cocaine cowboys” in the 1980s, Mickey Munday made millions of dollars flying loads of drugs for Colombia’s Medellin and Cali cartels.

  • FILE--In this Nov. 1, 2013, file photo, a car stops to allow a moose to cross Westpark Drive in Anchorage, Alaska. Moose killed by cars and truck along the Alaska road system are salvaged and donated to people on the Alaska State Troopers' "charity list" but the Alaska Moose Federation says all or parts of three moose killed recently have been stolen before they could be picked up and delivered for processing. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, file)

    Alaska roadkill thieves target moose meant for charity

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Thieves coming across dead moose on Alaska roads are stealing the carcasses, making away with hundreds of pounds of meat that normally goes to a program run by state troopers that gives it to the needy and others willing to butcher the carcasses, officials said Wednesday.

  • Los Alamos app for 1940s ‘Atomic City’ now on Android

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (AP) — An app that lets users experience Los Alamos during the nation’s top-secret World War II nuclear development program now is available on Android phones.

  • Military personnel clear debris at a temple that was damaged by a strong earthquake in Bagan, Myanmar, Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Using brooms and their hands soldiers and residents of the ancient Myanmar city famous for it's historic Buddhist pagodas, began cleaning up the debris from a powerful earthquake that shook the region and damaged nearly 200 temples Wednesday. (AP Photo/Min Kyi Thein)

    Quake damages scores of Myanmar’s heritage Bagan temples

    BAGAN, Myanmar (AP) — It was a time of conquest and conversions. Above all, it was a time of construction, on a scale never seen before. Over 250 years, from the 11th century onwards, the rulers of Bagan built more than 10,000 magnificent religious monuments.

  • In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 photo, James Cawley sits in the captains chair while talking about his replica of the starship Enterprise from the original "Star Trek" series during the Trekonderoga festival in Ticonderoga, N.Y. Sets mimicking those of the 1960s TV series “Star Trek” have become a tourist attraction in upstate New York. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

    Fan-made ‘Star Trek’ sets become tourist attraction in NY

    TICONDEROGA, N.Y. (AP) — On its many voyages through space, the Starship Enterprise has endured bridge-shaking blasts from enemy ships and infiltration by scheming aliens. Now it’s being invaded by tourists.

  • In this photo provided by Puerto Princesa Tourism Office, shows a giant pearl measuring 30cm wide (1ft), 67cm long (2.2ft) and weighing 34kg (75lb) is displayed in the lobby of the Puerto Princesa City Hall in Puerto Princesa city, Palawan province in southwestern Philippines Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Puerto Princesa Tourism Officer Aileen Amurao said the giant pearl was found by a relative fisherman ten years ago and entrusted to her for safekeeping and eventually to the mayor of the city. The still-to-be-authenticated find is said to be the largest in the world and would likely be valued in excess of US$100 million. (Herald Hugo/PPTO, via AP)

    Filipino fishermen find possibly world’s biggest pearl

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — A Filipino fisherman in western Palawan island has found possibly the world’s biggest pearl, but he didn’t know it.