• This is a  Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016  file photo of health workers as they get ready to spray insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmits the Zika virus under the bleachers of the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro,  which will be used for the Archery competition in the 2016 summer games. With the opening ceremony just over two months away, Olympic leaders have plenty of challenges to discuss this week when they meet for the last time before gathering in Rio de Janeiro on the eve of South America’s first games. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

    Rio problems, doping issues, refugee athletes on IOC agenda

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — With the opening ceremony in Rio de Janeiro just over two months away, Olympic leaders have plenty of troubling issues to deal with this week.

  • International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President and IOC Coordination Commission for Tokyo 2020 Chairman John Coates speaks during a press Briefing of the IOC Executive meeting for the Olympic Games Tokyo, in Tokyo, Thursday, May 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    IOC expresses concern over investigation into Tokyo 2020 bid

    TOKYO (AP) — IOC vice president John Coates expressed concern Thursday over payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning bid for the 2020 Olympics in a bribery investigation.

  • JOC sets up 3-man team to investigate Tokyo 2020 payments

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese Olympic Committee has set up an investigative team to see if there were any illegal payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning 2020 Olympic bid in a bribery investigation.

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.