• This July 3, 2014, file photo, shows the Microsoft Corp. logo outside the Microsoft Visitor Center in Redmond, Wash. Microsoft reports financial results Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo Ted S. Warren, File)

    As PCs decline, Microsoft betting its future on the cloud

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a world where there’s a smartphone app for everything, one company __ Amazon.com Inc. — has long been the host for an outsized share of online software and computing services.

  • The Latest: VW declines to comment on new diesel lawsuits

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — The Latest on lawsuits filed against Volkswagen over vehicles equipped with software that cheated on emissions tests (all times local):

  • University of New Hampshire student Kayla Aragona displays a device called Moocall with a pregnant cow named Magenta, Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Durham, N.H. The sensor attached to their tails sends text alerts to help detect when they're in labor. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    Moo-ving out: Sensor sends text alerts from cows in labor

    DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — University of New Hampshire dairy researchers are more relaxed these days about monitoring pregnant cows: A sensor attached to their tails sends text alerts to help detect when they’re in labor.

  • Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey, right, joined by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, discusses a lawsuit against Volkswagen, Tuesday, July 19, 2016, in New York. The states are suing Volkswagen and its affiliates Audi and Porsche over diesel emissions cheating, alleging that the German automakers defrauded customers by selling diesel vehicles equipped with software allowing them to cheat emissions testing. In response the company said, "The allegations in complaints filed by certain states today are essentially not new and we have been addressing them in our discussions with U.S. federal and state authorities." (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    NY, Massachusetts sue Volkswagen over emissions cheating

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York, Massachusetts and Maryland are suing Volkswagen and its affiliates Audi and Porsche over diesel emissions cheating, accusing the German automakers of defrauding customers, misleading regulators and then seeking to cover up the deception.

  • Kaushik Raghu, Senior Staff Engineer at Audi, is reflected in the passenger side visor mirror while demonstrating an Audi self driving vehicle on I-395 expressway in Arlington, Va., Friday, July 15, 2016. Experts say the development of self-driving cars over the coming decade depends on an unreliable assumption by most automakers: that the humans in them will be ready to step in and take control if the car's systems fail. Experience with automation in other modes of transportation suggests that strategy will lead to more deaths like that of a Florida Tesla driver in May. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Plans for self-driving cars have pitfall: the human brain

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Experts say the development of self-driving cars over the coming decade depends on an unreliable assumption by many automakers: that the humans in them will be ready to step in and take control if the car’s systems fail.

  • In this July 13, 2016 photo, a tiny "origami robot" floats, at right, towards a "wound" in a stomach model at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Steven Guitron, a mechanical engineering masters student, and others at MIT have developed these tiny ingestible robots which are "folded up" - hence the name - and swallowed in order to complete certain tasks within the body. So far they can be used to patch wounds, remove foreign objects, and even deliver medicine within the body. The robots unfold when ingested, and can be controlled by magnet forces outside of the body. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Having stomach troubles? Try swallowing an origami robot

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Has your child swallowed a small battery? In the future, a tiny robot made from pig gut could capture it and expel it.

  • This June 24, 2015, file photo, shows the Netflix Apple TV app icon, in South Orange, N.J. Netflix reports financial results on Monday, July 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Dan Goodman, File)

    Netflix facing tougher times as US subscriber growth slows

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — After years of spectacular success, Netflix is starting to hit some potholes. The high-flying internet video service added only 160,000 U.S. subscribers from April through June, its lowest gain in the period since splitting up its video-streaming and DVD-by-mail services five years ago.

  • How to get started playing ‘Pokemon Go’

    NEW YORK (AP) — Ready to hit the streets in search of a Pikachu?

  • In this July 14, 2016, photo, Associated Press reporter Todd Richmond tries to conquer “Pokemon Go” while walking around downtown Madison, Wis. The 44-year-old downloaded the app and played the game in an attempt to understand its popularity. (AP Photo by Bryna Godar)

    ‘Pokemon’ no: Trying, but failing to get the smartphone game

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — No one, it seems, can escape “Pokemon Go.”

  • In this Nov. 4, 2014, file photo, SoftBank founder and Chief Executive Officer Masayoshi Son speaks during a news conference in Tokyo. Japanese technology company SoftBank Group Corp. is buying British semiconductor company ARM Holdings for $31 billion. The agreement, disclosed Monday, July 18, 2016, underlines SoftBank's desire to expand in the Internet of Things, which refers to how almost anything these days has become a computer device that can connect online. SoftBank said ARM has a solid reputation as an innovator in the Internet of Things. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    Sprint owner Softbank to buy ARM in big post-Brexit deal

    TOKYO (AP) — Japanese technology company SoftBank Group Corp. is buying Britain’s ARM Holdings for 24.3 billion pounds ($32 billion), in a deal the British government hailed as a vote of confidence in the country following last month’s vote to leave the European Union.