• This Aug. 12, 2012, photo, taken at a research farm at the University of Nevada, Reno, and provided by the university, shows curly cup gumweed, a sticky cousin of the sunflower that is the target of research into efforts to use it to produce biofuels. UNR environmental sciences professor Glenn Miller and a team of scientists are in the second year of a four-year project funded by a $500,000 grant from the USDA. (Whip Villarreal/University of Nevada, Reno via AP)

    Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed — curly top gumweed — was growing along the road to the future.

  • In this July 30, 2014, file photo, Silicon Valley pioneer and Silent Circle co-founder Jon Callas holds up Blackphone with encryption apps displayed on it at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif. The Paris terrorist attacks have renewed the debate between law-enforcement officials and privacy advocates over whether there should be limits to encryption technology. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

    Why government and tech can’t agree about encryption

    NEW YORK (AP) — Your phone is getting better and better at protecting your privacy. But Uncle Sam isn’t totally comfortable with that, because it’s also complicating the work of tracking criminals and potential national-security threats.

  • Paula Swedeen, a forest policy specialist for the Washington Environmental Council, poses for a photo as she walks through forest land adjacent to Mount Rainier National Park on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, near Ashford, Wash. The land is part of a new project of 520 acres on private timberland that allows the private nonprofit Nisqually Land Trust to sell so-called "carbon credits" to individuals and companies - including Microsoft Corp. - who are hoping to offset their carbon footprints. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Washington project ensures forest stores carbon for decades

    SEATTLE (AP) — Half a small forest still standing near Mount Rainier faced clear-cutting before an effort in Washington state saved the decades-old trees and allowed Microsoft to help finance the project to offset its carbon footprint.

  • A laborer walks past piping at a desalination test facility on the outskirts of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. Authorities took journalists on a tour of the facility to show ways the United Arab Emirates, which relies heavily on desalinated seawater for its drinking water, is trying to make the process more environmentally friendly. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

    Parched Emirates relies on sea as groundwater runs out

    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — As skyscrapers and gleaming towers rose with lightning speed across the United Arab Emirates over the past two decades, the Gulf nation’s thirst for water grew at an enormous rate — so much so that today, it threatens to dry up all of the country’s groundwater in as little as 15 years, experts say.

  • In this Jan. 5, 2015, file photo, Joe Stinziano, executive vice president of Samsung Electronics America, introduces a Samsung SUHD 4K TV at a news conference in Las Vegas. There’s an emerging picture standard that offers four times the pixels of today’s high definition. It’s known as ultra-high definition, or 4K. But do you need it? (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

    TV Buying Guide: Get out tape measure before shopping

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — If you’re shopping for a TV, get out a tape measure and do some quick calculations before you head to the store. And count the number of gadgets you’ll want to connect to your screen.

  • In this Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015 photo, Cuban migrants line up for breakfast given to them by an evangelical church, outside of the border control building in Penas Blancas, Costa Rica, on the border with Nicaragua. Thousands of Cuban migrants have been able to make the trip to the U.S. thanks to a constant flow of information between migrants starting the journey and those who have just completed it. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

    Social media helps drive historic Cuban exodus to US

    PENAS BLANCAS, Costa Rica (AP) — As summer began to bake the central Cuban city of Sancti Spiritus, Elio Alvarez and Lideisy Hernandez sold their tiny apartment and everything in it for $5,000 and joined the largest migration from their homeland in decades.

  • Everyone loves same-day delivery, until they have to pay

    NEW YORK (AP) — Everyone likes the idea of same-day delivery. But who wants to pay for it?

  • In a Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2015, photo, personnel from Boulder, Colo.-based bizUAS Corp. demonstrate the use of a Cyberhawk octocopter drone for power line inspections at a New York Power Authority hydroelectric generating site in the Catskills, near Blenheim, N.Y. From routine inspections to catastrophic storm response, utilities are turning to drones to save money and improve safety in maintaining their networks of power lines and transmission towers, but remain hobbled by strict federal regulation of the aircraft. (AP Photo/Mary Esch)

    Utilities see potential in drones to inspect lines, towers

    BLENHEIM, N.Y. (AP) — U.S. utilities see great potential in the use of remote-controlled drones to do the often-dangerous work of inspecting power lines and transmission towers but strict regulations have so far slowed adoption of the technology.

  • In this Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, photo, waves distort the reflection in an indoor wave pool and wind tunnel at the University of Maine in Orono, Maine. The university's new wind-wave basin is capable of simulating some of the worst conditions at sea at a 1:50 scale.  (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    UMaine debuting ocean simulator to test sea-bound technology

    ORONO, Maine (AP) — Builders of everything from cruise ships and ports to oil rigs offshore wind turbines are tasked with the same question — will their work will be strong enough to stand up to the sea?

  • Microsoft’s 3Q earnings grow 31 pct; stock falls

    In this Jan. 5, 2011 file photo, Microsoft chief executive officer Steve Ballmer gives his Keynote speech for the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas. Microsoft reports quarterly earnings Thursday, April 28, 2011, after the market close.(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, file)

    Microsoft Corp.’s latest quarterly earnings rose 31 percent even as sales of its Windows operating system sagged.