• California governor OKs medical marijuana regulations

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A trio of bills aimed at bringing order and oversight to California’s medical marijuana industry nearly 20 years after the state led the nation in legalizing pot for medical use won Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature, his office said Friday.

  • In this Sept. 9, 2015, file photo, Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, as she receives congratulations from Ellen Pontac, left, after a right-to die measure was approved by the state Assembly in Sacramento, Calif. California will become the fifth state to allow terminally ill patients to legally end their lives using doctor-prescribed drugs after Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 he signed one of the most emotionally charged bills of the year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    California governor signs hard-won right-to-die legislation

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a rare personal message, California’s 77-year-old governor provided insight into his deliberations before deciding to sign a bill allowing terminally ill Californians to legally take their own lives, reflecting on religion and self-determination as he weighed an emotionally fraught choice.

  • In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, Alabama Probate Judge Nick Williams laughs in a court room at the Washington County court house in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.   (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    Alabama judges use segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As Alabama’s all-white Legislature tried to preserve racial segregation and worried about the possibility of mixed-race marriages in 1961, lawmakers rewrote state law to make it optional for counties to issue marriage licenses.