• In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, people watch as stores burn in Ferguson, Mo. The four Republican candidates in Missouri's gubernatorial primary on Aug. 2, 2016, are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach, two years after the fatal Ferguson police shooting of Michael Brown prompted widespread protests. But the four candidates aren't focusing on complaints about police discrimination. Instead, their TV ads have shown images of riots while promising to "secure our streets" and "enforce the law." (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    2 years after Ferguson, recriminations roil governor’s race

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — It has been two years since a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, touching off days of rioting, but the political repercussions from the incident have only intensified, fanned by a governor’s race in which all four Republican candidates are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., listens to community leaders at a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine’s cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion.

  • Lawmaker calls for DA involved in traffic stop to step down

    SILVER CITY, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico lawmaker is calling for the resignation of a district attorney who was allowed to leave without taking a field sobriety test despite police believing she was intoxicated.

  • Emails: Group asked governor for religious objections order

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Emails disclosed in a lawsuit over a blocked Mississippi law that protects religious objections to same-sex marriage show a Christian legal group asked Gov. Phil Bryant to institute the protections through an executive order in 2015.

  • $6.2 million to improve southeastern Michigan trail network

    DETROIT (AP) — Officials say $6.2 million will be used to improve southeastern Michigan’s trail network.

  • New Mexico governor disputes claim Trump reached out on VP

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is disputing a claim that Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump tried to contact her to be vetted for vice president.

  • Top Massachusetts lawmaker makes play for NBA All-Star Game

    BOSTON (AP) — Boston is apparently out of the running for the 2017 NBA All-Star game, which became available after the league decided to move the event out of Charlotte, North Carolina.

  • Speaker supports session to oust accused lawmaker

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a story July 21 about a lawmaker facing possible expulsion form the Tennessee General Assembly, The Associated Press spelled one legislative leader’s first name incorrectly. The lawmaker’s name is Glen Casada, not Gled.