• Supreme Court sides with state in financial settlements

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico Supreme Court will not intervene in two settlement agreements that pave the way for the state to recover $1.3 million in connection with politically influenced investment deals dating back to the administration of former Gov. Bill Richardson.

  • New Mexico leaders look to recruit more female candidates

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico voters made history in 2010 when they elected Republican Susana Martinez as the state’s first female governor.

  • In this photo taken Monday, June 13, 2016, Governor of the Odessa region, Mikhail Saakashvili speaks to the Associated Press in Odessa, Ukraine. Saakashvili, the former president of Georgia, has brought his corruption-fighting record to his job as governor of the Odessa region in Ukraine. So far, however, the pace has been dismally slow. His stifled efforts in Odessa show the systemic problems still facing the entire country two years after it broke with Moscow and aligned itself firmly with the West. (AP Photo/Sergei Poliakov)

    Ukraine’s Georgian corruption fighter sets his sights higher

    ODESSA, Ukraine (AP) — Mikhail Saakashvili, the former president of Georgia, has brought his corruption-fighting record to his job as governor of the Odessa region in Ukraine.

  • In this Feb. 4, 2016, file photo, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., gives a 'thumbs-up' as he takes his seat at the head table for the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. Kaine is one of several Democrats that Hillary Clinton is considering for her vice presidential running mate.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    Kaine brings steady hand, confidence to Clinton ticket

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Nerdy? Sure. Boring? Never.

  • Man fatally shot by Gallup police; investigation underway

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State authorities are investigating after Gallup police shot and killed a man who they say had been armed with knives.

  • A look at how states compare on women in elected office

    Women comprise half of the U.S. population, yet they are underrepresented at various levels of elected office. Here is a closer look at how states compare when it comes to women in elected office:

  • State Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson, D-Santa Barbara, left, talks to reporters accompanied by Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Lois Angeles, second from left; Sen. Isadore Hall III, D-Compton, third from and left and Sen. Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley, at the Capitol, in Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday, June 30, 2016. Jackson is chairwoman of the powerful judiciary committee as well as the California Legislative Women's Caucus. Jackson’s legislative accomplishments include what was considered the strongest equal pay legislation in the country. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    DIVIDED AMERICA: Clinton highlights lack of women in office

    Hillary Clinton and Mary Thomas have little in common, except for this: They both hope to add to the meager ranks of America’s female elected officials come January.

  • In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, people watch as stores burn in Ferguson, Mo. The four Republican candidates in Missouri's gubernatorial primary on Aug. 2, 2016, are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach, two years after the fatal Ferguson police shooting of Michael Brown prompted widespread protests. But the four candidates aren't focusing on complaints about police discrimination. Instead, their TV ads have shown images of riots while promising to "secure our streets" and "enforce the law." (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    2 years after Ferguson, recriminations roil governor’s race

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — It has been two years since a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, touching off days of rioting, but the political repercussions from the incident have only intensified, fanned by a governor’s race in which all four Republican candidates are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., listens to community leaders at a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine’s cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion.