• In this Sept. 9, 2015, file photo, Debbie Ziegler holds a photo of her late daughter, Brittany Maynard, as she receives congratulations from Ellen Pontac, left, after a right-to die measure was approved by the state Assembly in Sacramento, Calif. California will become the fifth state to allow terminally ill patients to legally end their lives using doctor-prescribed drugs after Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday, Oct. 5, 2015 he signed one of the most emotionally charged bills of the year. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    California governor signs hard-won right-to-die legislation

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a rare personal message, California’s 77-year-old governor provided insight into his deliberations before deciding to sign a bill allowing terminally ill Californians to legally take their own lives, reflecting on religion and self-determination as he weighed an emotionally fraught choice.

    Updated: 2:03 am

  • Group asks NM Supreme Court to weigh in PNM case

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists asked the New Mexico Supreme Court on Monday to disqualify all but one member of a powerful state regulatory board in a case that will determine the fate of a coal-fired power plant that serves customers throughout the Southwest.

  • In this Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2015, photo, Alabama Probate Judge Nick Williams laughs in a court room at the Washington County court house in Chatom, Ala. Williams, also a Baptist minister in Washington County, is among those who have stopped issuing any marriage licenses.   (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    Alabama judges use segregation-era law to avoid gay marriage

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — As Alabama’s all-white Legislature tried to preserve racial segregation and worried about the possibility of mixed-race marriages in 1961, lawmakers rewrote state law to make it optional for counties to issue marriage licenses.

  • In this photo taken June 23, 2015, the Mississippi state flag is unfurled against the front of the Governor's Mansion in Jackson, Miss.  A new proposal seeks a statewide election on removing the Confederate battle emblem from the Mississippi flag. But it could be years before the issue gets on the ballot, and there's no guarantee voters would accept it.(AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Proposal would erase Confederate sign from Mississippi flag

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A new proposal seeks a statewide election on removing the Confederate battle emblem from the Mississippi flag. But it could be years before the issue gets on the ballot, and there’s no guarantee voters would accept it.

  • Senators from the Dakotas make friendly bet on football game

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota U.S. Sen. John Hoeven and South Dakota U.S. Sen. John Thune have made a friendly wager on the outcome on Saturday’s football game between North Dakota State University and South Dakota State.

  • Cars head toward the railroad underpass in Spartanburg, S.C., where 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga was killed on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, when flood waters inundated her car as she was driving home from work. The underpass is not wide enough to accommodate two cars, so motorists must alternate going under it. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)

    East Coast braces for more heavy rain, approaching hurricane

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — Millions along the East Coast breathed a little easier Friday after forecasters said Hurricane Joaquin would probably veer out to sea instead of joining up with a drenching rainstorm that is bringing severe flooding to parts of the Atlantic Seaboard.

  • In this  Aug. 12, 2015 file photo Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane speaks during a news conference at the state Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa.   Kane faces a new charge Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015 that stems from evidence found during an execution of a search warrant at her office Sept. 17. Kane was previously charged with perjury, conspiracy and other counts. Prosecutors say she leaked confidential information from a 2009 grand jury probe and then tried to cover it up. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

    Pennsylvania attorney general charged with 2nd perjury count

    COLLEGEVILLE, Pa. (AP) — Prosecutors added a new perjury count and other criminal charges Thursday against Pennsylvania’s attorney general, saying they found a signed document that contradicts her claims she never agreed to maintain secrecy of a grand jury investigation in 2009, before she took office.

  • Governors in the Dakotas make friendly bet on football game

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota Gov. Jack Dalrymple and South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard have made a friendly wager on the outcome of this weekend’s football matchup between North Dakota State University and South Dakota State.

  • Emergency personnel, including South Carolina Highway Patrol and the Spartanburg County Coroner's Office, work on the scene where several cars were trapped briefly under a bridge during flooding from heavy rain Thursday morning, Oct. 1, 2015, in Spartanburg, S.C. Spartanburg County Coroner Rusty Clevenger told local media that a person died early Thursday when several cars were submerged in flash floods under the bridge, where flooding often occurs during heavy rain. (AP Photo/Spartanburg Herald-Journal/Tim Kimzey) MANDATORY CREDIT

    1 dies in flooding as storms threaten to move up East Coast

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — Drenching rains along an already-saturated East Coast caused major flooding Thursday, drowning a woman whose car quickly filled up with water and prompting flash-flood warnings from historic Charleston to Washington, D.C.

  • This undated file photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows death row inmate Richard Glossip. In a 3-2 decision, the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals on Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, denied Glossip's request for an evidentiary hearing and an emergency stay of execution. The court ruled the state can proceed with Glossip's execution. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File)

    Man convicted of ordering boss’ killing set for execution

    McALESTER, Okla. (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin postponed at the last minute Wednesday the execution of an inmate who claims he’s innocent, after prison officials said one of the three drugs they had received to carry out the lethal injection didn’t match state guidelines.