• In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • In this Feb. 26, 2014, file photo, an election official checks a voter's photo identification at an early voting polling site in Austin, Texas. A federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, July 20, 2016, that Texas' strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must quickly be scrubbed of those effects before the November 2016 election. Voters will still need to show identification at the polls under the decision by the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, according to attorneys who challenged the law, but a lower court will now also have to devise a way for Texas to accommodate those who cannot. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

    Appeals court: Texas voter ID law discriminates; orders fix

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas’ strict voter ID law discriminates against minorities and the poor and must be weakened before the November elections, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday, following claims that at least a half-million registered voters could have struggled to cast a ballot.