• A man paddles a kayak down a flooded street in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    Gusty wind may add to weather risks on soggy East Coast

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Hundreds were rescued from fast-moving floodwaters Sunday in South Carolina as days of driving rain hit a dangerous crescendo that buckled buildings and roads, closed a major East Coast interstate route and threatened the drinking water supply for the capital city.

    Updated: 11:13 pm

  • Brothers Logan Froehler, 17, at left, and Lukas, 11, throw a football while kayaking in their backyard on the Isle of Palms, S.C. on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. The National Weather Service says the risk of flooding will continue through Monday morning, especially in parts of North and South Carolina that already have gotten up to 11 inches of rain this week. Forecasters say some areas could see storm totals as high as 15 inches. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

    More rain, flooding forecast along soggy East Coast

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — While spared the full fury of Hurricane Joaquin, parts of the East Coast saw record-setting rain Saturday that shut down roads, waterlogged crops and showed little sign of letting up.

  • Cars head toward the railroad underpass in Spartanburg, S.C., where 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga was killed on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, when flood waters inundated her car as she was driving home from work. The underpass is not wide enough to accommodate two cars, so motorists must alternate going under it. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)

    East Coast braces for more heavy rain, approaching hurricane

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — Millions along the East Coast breathed a little easier Friday after forecasters said Hurricane Joaquin would probably veer out to sea instead of joining up with a drenching rainstorm that is bringing severe flooding to parts of the Atlantic Seaboard.