• Congresswoman Leni Robredo is proclaimed Philippine Vice-president-elect by Senate President Franklin Drilon, second from left, and House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, third from right, during a ceremony Monday, May 30, 2016 at the Lower House in suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. Robredo won over her closest rival Sen. Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr., the son of the late strongman Ferdinand Marcos who ruled the country for 20 years. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Philippine Congress proclaims next president, vice president

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine Congress on Monday proclaimed crime-busting Mayor Rodrigo Duterte as president-elect and Rep. Leni Robredo as vice president-elect of a country that has been posting high growth rates but remains saddled with poverty, corruption and insurgencies.

    Updated: 4:25 am

  • Ariya Jutanugarn, of Thailand, stands with the LPGA Volvik Championship trophy after winning the golf tournament at the Travis Pointe Country Club, Sunday, May 29, 2016 in Ann Arbor, Mich. Jutanugarn is holding up three fingers to signify that she has won three LPGA tournaments in a row. (AP Photo/Jose Juarez)

    Ariya Jutanugarn wins 3rd straight LPGA Tour title

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Ariya Jutanugarn’s strength and skill helped her become the first player to win three straight LPGA Tour events in three years.

  • In this image made from video, Attaporn Boonmakchuay gestures while talking to reporters, while lying in a hospital bed following a snake attack at his home in Chachoengsao, 90km east of the capital Bangkok, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Boonmakchuay is recovering from a bloody encounter with a 3-meter (10-foot) python that slithered through the plumbing of his home and latched its jaws onto his penis as he was using a squat toilet. (BBTV CH7 Thailand via AP) THAILAND OUT

    Thai man bloodied but unbowed after intimate attack by snake

    BANGKOK (AP) — A Thai man is recovering from a bloody encounter with a 3-meter (10-foot) python that slithered through the plumbing of his home and latched its jaws onto his penis as he was using a squat toilet.

  • International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President and IOC Coordination Commission for Tokyo 2020 Chairman John Coates speaks during a press Briefing of the IOC Executive meeting for the Olympic Games Tokyo, in Tokyo, Thursday, May 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    IOC expresses concern over investigation into Tokyo 2020 bid

    TOKYO (AP) — IOC vice president John Coates expressed concern Thursday over payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning bid for the 2020 Olympics in a bribery investigation.

  • FILE- In this Aug. 1, 2013 file photo, Win Kyu, left, and his wife Khin Htay Win hold a portrait of their 16-year-old daughter Win Maw Oo, who was killed during pro-democracy protests brutally crushed by Myanmar's military 25 years ago, in their house in Yangon, Myanmar. The parents of a Oo after all these years finally laid her soul to rest this week. The funeral ceremony, 28 years late, was delayed because the 16-year-old girl's dying wish was not to have the rites performed until Myanmar _then called Burma _ had achieved democracy. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win, File)

    Democracy helps fulfill long-dead Myanmar teen’s last wish

    YANGON, Myanmar (AP) — Dying from soldiers’ bullets, the young protester told her father not to lay her soul to rest until democracy reigned in her homeland. It has taken 28 years, but it is done.

  • In this May 12, 2016 photo, a man walks on dry and cracked earth with empty plastic containers to collect drinking water from a fenced-off pond in Dala township, south of Yangon, Myanmar. Myanmar's dry season, which typically runs from April through May, has been compounded this year by an El Nino-induced drought that added several months to the water shortage affecting Dala township. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

    As lines form for water, Myanmar pins hopes on Suu Kyi

    DALA, Myanmar (AP) — Every year at this time, the ponds and wells go dry. People walk for hours to fill their plastic buckets at a lotus-filled pond that is the only clean source of drinking water in this community outside Myanmar’s biggest city, Yangon.

  • JOC sets up 3-man team to investigate Tokyo 2020 payments

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese Olympic Committee has set up an investigative team to see if there were any illegal payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning 2020 Olympic bid in a bribery investigation.

  • President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands after speaking to media in Shima, Japan, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama to wrap up trip to Vietnam by talking to young leaders

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Laying bare the complex politics of reconciliation and contrition, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday rejected the idea of visiting Pearl Harbor to reciprocate for President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Hiroshima later this week. Obama, for his part, said he would use his time in Hiroshima to honor all those killed in World War II and to push for a world without nuclear weapons.

  • A bus moves a migrant family to a government-built camps during a police operation at a makeshift refugee camp at the Greek-Macedonian border near the northern Greek village of Idomeni, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Greek authorities began an operation at dawn Tuesday to gradually evacuate the country's largest informal refugee camp of Idomeni on the Macedonian border, blocking access to the area and sending in more than 400 riot police. (AP Photo/Giannis Papanikos)

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.