• In this June 8, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands in Rancho Mirage, Calif. President Barack Obama will turn the posh 200-acre California desert estate into a center of international diplomacy Monday, Feb. 15, 2016, when he welcomes Southeast Asian leaders for a two-day summit. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

    Obama uses California’s Sunnylands as Western White House

    RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. (AP) — The guest list at Sunnylands reads like a roster of the rich and famous, from years past to today: Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, Warren Buffet, Bill Gates and Queen Elizabeth II, to name a few.

    Updated: 5:32 am

  • In this Nov. 19, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama shakes hands with Thailand’s Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha in Manila, Philippines. When President Barack Obama welcomes Southeast Asian leaders for a shirt-sleeves summit in California this week, he’ll have some interesting dining companions. There will be a coup leader with a penchant for song, a sultan with a taste for the high life and a ruthless prime minister with 31 years on the job.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    Things to know about Obama’s summit with SE Asian leaders

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama hosts Southeast Asian leaders at an unprecedented summit in California starting Monday as he looks to deepen ties with the region’s fast-growing economies. But a nation not invited — neighboring power China — will be the proverbial elephant in the room as the leaders grapple with sensitive territorial disputes.

  • Bangladesh begins survey of undocumented Rohingya Muslims

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Authorities in Bangladesh began a survey to determine the number of Rohingya Muslims who have fled persecution in majority-Buddhist Myanmar.

  • In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016 file photo, Filipino Muslims shout slogans during a protest at the Philippine Congress in suburban Quezon city, northeast of Manila, Philippines because they believe the Philippine Congress has run out of time to pass under the current president's term a Muslim autonomy bill that aims to peacefully settle a decades-long Muslim rebellion in the south. The Philippine government and Muslim rebels have extended the stay of international cease-fire monitors at their first meeting since their peace pact stalled amid fears of fresh fighting. In their joint statement issued Friday, Feb. 12, government negotiator Miriam Coronel-Ferrer and her rebel counterpart, Mohagher Iqbal, expressed disappointment over Philippine Congress's failure to pass a Muslim autonomy bill that's required under a 2014 peace accord that ended decades of fighting in the southern Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

    Philippines, rebels fortify truce amid stalled peace pact

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippine government and Muslim rebels have extended the stay of international cease-fire monitors at their first meeting since their peace pact stalled amid fears of fresh fighting.

  • In this Friday, April 3, 2015 file photo, Burmese fishermen arrive at the compound of Pusaka Benjina Resources to report themselves for departure to leave the fishing company in Benjina, Aru Islands, Indonesia as hundreds of foreign fishermen rush at the chance to be rescued from the isolated island where an Associated Press report revealed slavery runs rampant in the industry. A bill headed for President Obama this week includes a provision that would ban U.S. imports of fish caught by slaves in Southeast Asia, gold mined by children in Africa and garments sewn by abused women in Bangladesh, closing a loophole in an 85-year-old tariff law that has failed to keep products of forced and child labor out of America. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara, File)

    Congress bans import of forced labor products

    A bill headed for President Barack Obama this week includes a provision that would ban U.S. imports of fish caught by slaves in Southeast Asia, gold mined by children in Africa and garments sewn by abused women in Bangladesh, closing a loophole in an 85-year-old tariff law that has failed to keep products of forced and child labor out of America.

  • People look at an electronic stock board of a securities firm in Tokyo, Friday, Feb. 12, 2016 . Japan's main stock index dived Friday, leading other Asian markets lower, after a sell-off in banking shares roiled investors in the U.S. and Europe. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

    Japan stocks down 5.3 percent after Europe, US sell-off

    TOKYO (AP) — European stocks rose Friday, shrugging off a bad day in Asia, as the sell-off in banking shares abated and oil prices rebounded from a 12-year low. But Japan’s main stock index lost nearly 5 percent, leading other Asian markets lower.

  • 2 foreign race callers among 4 finalists for Santa Anita job

    ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) — Race callers from Britain and Singapore are among the four finalists to become the permanent track announcer at Santa Anita.

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by a sharp drop in Hong Kong as it caught up with global market turmoil after Lunar New Year holidays. An escalation in tensions between North and South Korea added to a litany of woes for markets that were already flustered by signs of slowing global growth and the slide in oil prices.

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.

  • A man looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 in Tokyo, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Asian stock markets fell for a third consecutive day Wednesday, beset by nerves about shaky global growth, falling oil prices and possible capital shortfalls at major European banks. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Global stocks turn higher ahead of Yellen testimony

    LONDON (AP) — European stocks rose Wednesday and Wall Street was expected to open higher ahead of testimony from the Federal Reserve chief that could either ease market turmoil or add to it. Asian markets mostly fell in a spillover sell-off from the previous day’s losses.