• Tim Gregson, left, hits the ball with his mallet Sunday afternoon, Aug. 30, 2015,  as other polo players make chase during a match at the Newton Fork Ranch outside of Hill City, S.D. The Rapid City Black Hills Polo Club and the Hill City Rushmore Polo and Social Club took to the field for the final time on Sunday afternoon. They decided to quit after this year because it's becoming increasingly difficult to organize matches and train the horses. (Chris Huber/Rapid City Journal via AP) TV OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

    Polo tradition ends in Black Hills after 3 decades

    HILL CITY, S.D. (AP) — A 30-year tradition between two polo teams in the Black Hills has come to an end because of problems coordinating the annual matches.

    Updated: 1:47 pm

  • This 1982 photo provided by The National Park Service shows a park employee sitting on a rock in Calcite Lake at The Wind Cave National Park in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The underground lakes, which were discovered in the 1960s, aren't home to any animal life but prominent cave microbiologist Hazel Barton has discovered there is bacteria - albeit scant - in the lakes. Barton hopes to decipher how the bacteria survives and answer questions about how it interacted before multicellular organisms came along and perhaps find new sources of antibiotics. (The National Park Service via AP)

    Far below South Dakota, a cave holds pure, promising water

    WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, S.D. (AP) — Hundreds of feet beneath the Black Hills, a team of scientists and researchers snake through dark, narrow and silent corridors of ancient rock to reach their goal: what is thought to be some of the purest water on Earth.

  • In this Thursday, July 30, 2015 photo, Salvatore Emma Jr., president and CEO of Micron Products, displays Blunt Impact Projectiles, one ready for use, left, and another after being fired during a test at the factory in Fitchburg, Mass. The projectiles utilize new technology developed by the company to provide law enforcement with less-lethal ammunition engineered to cushion and displace the force of impact, designed to cause pain and discomfort but not serious injury. The technology is part of a push to find ways for law enforcement to be able to use force with non-deadly means. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

    Less-lethal weapons get new interest amid police shootings

    FITCHBURG, Mass. (AP) — Police in more than 20 North American cities are testing the latest in less-lethal alternatives to bullets — “blunt impact projectiles” that cause suspects excruciating pain but stop short of killing them. Or at least that’s the goal.

  • Sioux Falls Skyforce to keep affiliation with Miami Heat

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The NBA’s Miami Heat has extended the team’s partnership with the NBA Development League’s Sioux Falls Skyforce through the 2016-17 season.