• Cathy Stinson, left, and Maria Mayer help a friend remove belongings from her flooded home in Forest Acres in Columbia, S.C., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. People in the city are beginning cleanup after being pummeled by a historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    Round 2: Downstream South Carolina towns brace for flooding

    GEORGETOWN, S.C. (AP) — Rivers rose and dams bulged Wednesday as South Carolina faced another anxious day of waiting for the floodwaters to recede, and dive teams searched for two people who disappeared in waters after they drove around a barricade.

  • Swinney: Lakip took part in pre-trial intervention program

    CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) — Clemson coach Dabo Swinney says kicker Ammon Lakip went through a pre-trial intervention program and had his misdemeanor drug arrest expunged.

  • A road is washed out from flooding in Columbia, S.C., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015.  Despite an improving forecast, it will still take weeks for the state to return to normal after being pummeled by an historic rainstorm. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    AD not 100 percent sure South Carolina will host LSU game

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina athletic director Ray Tanner is not “100 percent sure” that Saturday’s football game against No. 7 LSU will be played at Williams-Brice Stadium because of the devastating floods that hit the state this past weekend.

  • This aerial photo show flooding around homes in the Carolina Forest community in Horry County, between Conway and Myrtle Beach, S.C. The Carolinas saw sunshine Tuesday after days of inundation, but it could take weeks to recover from being pummeled by a historic rainstorm that caused widespread flooding and multiple deaths. (Janet Blackmon Morgan/The Sun News via AP)

    Despite sunny forecast, South Carolina ordeal far from over

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The family of Miss South Carolina 1954 found her flood-soaked pageant scrapbook on a dining room floor littered with dead fish on Tuesday, as the first sunny day in nearly two weeks provided a chance to clean up from historic floods.

  • A pickup truck rests against the side of Gills Creek near a bridge in Columbia, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. Days of torrential rains kept much of South Carolina and its capital gripped by floodwaters early Monday. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    AP PHOTOS: Gills Creek gets one of rainiest days in years

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — The epicenter of the massive East Coast rainstorm is Gills Creek, a stream that starts off in a sparsely populated area near a state park north of Columbia. The creek runs through several neighborhoods before emptying into the Congaree River south of town.

  • Rosters for the Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — The rosters of the North Carolina and South Carolina football teams for the Shrine Bowl of the Carolinas, which will be played in Gibbs Stadium at Wofford College on Dec. 19:

  • Floodwaters close in on homes on a small piece of land on Lake Katherine in Columbia, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. After a week of steady rain, the showers tapered off Monday and an inundated South Carolina turned to surveying a road system shredded by historic flooding. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    South Carolina flood: Door-to-door searches, swamped roads

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — People across South Carolina got an object lesson Monday in how you can dodge a hurricane and still get hammered.

  • Monday, October 5, 2015

    The Latest: Takaaki Kajita, Arthur McDonald win 2015 Nobel prize in physics

  • A man paddles a kayak down a flooded street in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    Gusty wind may add to weather risks on soggy East Coast

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Hundreds were rescued from fast-moving floodwaters Sunday in South Carolina as days of driving rain hit a dangerous crescendo that buckled buildings and roads, closed a major East Coast interstate route and threatened the drinking water supply for the capital city.

  • Brothers Logan Froehler, 17, at left, and Lukas, 11, throw a football while kayaking in their backyard on the Isle of Palms, S.C. on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. The National Weather Service says the risk of flooding will continue through Monday morning, especially in parts of North and South Carolina that already have gotten up to 11 inches of rain this week. Forecasters say some areas could see storm totals as high as 15 inches. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

    More rain, flooding forecast along soggy East Coast

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — While spared the full fury of Hurricane Joaquin, parts of the East Coast saw record-setting rain Saturday that shut down roads, waterlogged crops and showed little sign of letting up.