• Venezuela beats Cuba 3-1, reaches Caribbean Series semis

    SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) — Alex Romero, Jose Martinez and Sandy Leon drove in runs to lead Venezuela’s Aragua Tigers over Cuba’s Ciego de Avila 3-1 Thursday and advance to the Caribbean Series semifinals.

  • Brazil, Shakhtar player Fred’s doping ban extended worldwide

    ZURICH (AP) — FIFA has extended Brazil midfielder Fred’s doping ban worldwide, ruling him out of four months of matches for Shakhtar Donetsk.

  • Young revelers joke with each other as they lay on the shade during the "Burial of the Mosquito" carnival block parade in Olinda, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016. The parade that happens every year during carnival informs residents and tourists about the dangers of the Aedes aegypti and teaches them how to combat the mosquito. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    For Brazil’s Carnival fans, even Zika can’t stop the party

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazilian Carnival could be called a hungry mosquito’s dream — five days of non-stop street parties that bring together millions of revelers in an inviting mass of bare ankles, uncovered legs and denuded torsos. So the mosquito-borne Zika virus might be expected to dampen this year’s debauchery.

  • A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in an open area of a sports facility, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. With no hope for a vaccine to prevent Zika in the near future, authorities are focusing on the most effective way to combat the virus: killing the mosquito that carries it. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil minister says no plans to cancel Rio Games

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazilian organizers have reiterated they have no intention of canceling the Rio de Janeiro Olympics because of the outbreak of the Zika virus, with Sports Minister George Hilton saying the topic “is not in discussion.”

  • Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to be tested for various diseases perch inside a container at the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory in Panama City, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Panamanian authorities announced on Monday that 50 cases of the Zika virus infection have been detected in Panama's sparsely populated Guna Yala indigenous area along the Caribbean coast. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is vector for the spread of the Zika virus. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

    The Latest: US, Colombia to team up on Zika research

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Latest on the mosquito-born Zika virus, which is suspected of causing brain deformities in babies (all times local):

  • A municipal health worker sprays insecticide in an open area of a sports facility, to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. With no hope for a vaccine to prevent Zika in the near future, authorities are focusing on the most effective way to combat the virus: killing the mosquito that carries it. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil health official confirm Zika spread via transfusion

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Two people in southeastern Brazil contracted the Zika virus through blood transfusions, a municipal health official said Thursday, presenting a fresh challenge to efforts to contain the virus on top of the disclosure of a case of sexual transmission in the United States.

  • In this Feb. 1, 2016 photo, a technician from the British biotec company Oxitec, inspects the pupae of genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, a vector for transmitting the Zika virus, in Campinas, Brazil. The company said tests begun last April as part of a dengue-fighting program in the small southeastern city of Piracicaba suggested the release of the GM males reduced the wild Aedes larvae population in the target neighborhood by more than 80 percent. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika outbreak and authorities say they have also detected a spike in cases of microcephaly in newborn children, but the link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

    British Olympic Association providing guidance on Zika

    LONDON (AP) — The British Olympic Association says it will provide medical guidance to athletes about the Zika virus ahead of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

  • In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, file photo, Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks speaks to the media and members of the public from a balcony at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Wedneday Feb. 3, 2016 that he will accept arrest by British police if a U.N. working group investigating his claims decides that the three years he has spent inside the Ecuadorean Embassy doesn't amount to illegal detention. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)

    The Latest: Legal expert questions reported Assange ruling

    LONDON (AP) — The Latest on WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and impending finding by a U.N. body on his detention (all times local):

  • Mercosur Health Ministers and part of  their delegations pose for an official photo after attending the summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate efforts to fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    Uruguay has ‘no qualms” playing at center of Zika outbreak

    MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) — Uruguay will go ahead with a World Cup qualifier scheduled next month in Recife, the Brazilian city at the center of an outbreak of the Zika virus.

  • In this Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012, file photo, Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks speaks to the media and members of the public from a balcony at the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said Wedneday Feb. 3, 2016 that he will accept arrest by British police if a U.N. working group investigating his claims decides that the three years he has spent inside the Ecuadorean Embassy doesn't amount to illegal detention. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)

    Assange to accept arrest if UN rules against him

    LONDON (AP) — WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has found a surprising ally — a little known United Nations panel that has decided he has been unfairly detained in Britain while seeking to avoid extradition to Sweden to answer allegations of sexual misconduct.