• Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    America’s oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center — can remember the economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton ran for president. The younger end of the generation — now nearing 20 — can’t recall a time without terrorism or economic worry.

  • Homeless awareness campaign breaks fist-bumping record

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Three hundred people in Alaska looking to raise awareness of homelessness are the new world record holders in fist-bumping.

  • In a May 25, 2016 file photo, emergency personnel carrying a volunteer with simulated injuries is carried during a training exercise for an active shooter at Hopewell Elementary School, in West Chester, Ohio.  Violent or disruptive threats are increasing nationwide, according to police, school employees, security consultants and others, blamed sometimes on local students and sometimes on outsiders seeking to cause disruptions or a big emergency response. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

    When schools are threatened, untold learning time is lost

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The prosecutor calls it “bomb week,” his shorthand for eight school threats — many written in school bathrooms or on notes — over a few days in May that set off evacuations and investigations, parental panic, and the rumor mill of students linked by cellphones and social media in his Ohio county.

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, July 28, 2016, two Syrian refugees, left, concentrate during an English lesson with a volunteer teacher in London. As the U.K. struggles to implement its commitment to resettle more than 20,000 Syrians, the government is counting on charities and community groups to help the newcomers adjust to life in Britain. The Home Office has for the first time set up a program to allow local organizations to sponsor refugees and the agency’s website directs volunteers to migrant charities that need their help.  (AP Photo/Adela Suliman)

    Syrian refugees support each other in Britain

    LONDON (AP) — A summer rainstorm pounded down on the eaves of Christ the Saviour church hall in London as Fardous Bahbouh poured tea and set up the makeshift classroom where she teaches some 25 Syrian refugees how to ask for directions in English, shop for groceries and navigate British norms in making new friends.

  • Farmers seek tax credit for donations to food pantries

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Each year New York farmers give millions of pounds of apples, squash, corn or other agricultural products to the state’s food banks. Now they’re looking to get some credit for those good deeds — a tax credit.

  • In this Aug. 15, 2016 photo, photographer Andrew George, right, poses with Nelly Gutierrez, who is featured in George's exhibit, "Right, Before I Die," at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles. The exhibit, which features portraits of people facing serious illnesses, will run until Sept. 30.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

    LA art exhibition look at dying through words, photos

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Four years ago photographer Andrew George approached the medical director of a Los Angeles hospital with an unusual request: He wanted to meet and take photographs of people about to die.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016, photo Ashik Uddin gestures as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press outside the Al-Furqan Jame mosque in the Ozone Park neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York.  The shooting of an imam and his assistant near their New York mosque has unnerved Muslim residents of the Ozone Park section of Queens.  (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Imam’s shooting death shakes storied immigrant neighborhood

    NEW YORK (AP) — The gunman, police said, was Hispanic. His two victims were Bangladeshi Muslims, one an imam, shot without provocation on their way home from their mosque.

  • CORRECTS SPELLING OF FIRST NAME TO JEFFERY FROM JEFFREY - This undated photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows death row inmate Jeffery Wood. A Republican lawmaker in Texas says a bipartisan group of legislators will take the highly unusual step of urging the state to halt the execution of Wood, who didn't pull the trigger during a fatal 1996 robbery. Wood is scheduled to die by lethal injection Wednesday. He was convicted under a Texas law that makes a participant in a capital murder crime equally culpable, even though it was Wood's friend who shot a store clerk. (Texas Department of Criminal Justice via AP)

    Execution halted for Texas accomplice who wasn’t triggerman

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A court halted the execution of a Texas man who was scheduled to die for a fatal 1996 robbery in which he wasn’t the person who pulled the trigger.

  • Veiled women walk in central Algiers, Wednesday Aug. 10, 2016.  Mosques are going up, women are covering up and bars, restaurants and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.(AP Photo/Ouahab Hebbat)

    Fundamentalists gain ground in Algeria as war memory fades

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — Mosques are going up, women are covering up, and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.

  • Tear gas shells are exploded to disperse Kashmiri Muslim protesters in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. The Himalayan region has been under curfew for almost six weeks as the largest street protests in years erupted after Indian troops killed a top rebel leader. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

    AP EXPLAINS: Why Kashmir has been torn by decadeslong strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread in early July that Indian troops had killed a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group, the public response was spontaneous and immense. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.