• In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, Cornell William Brooks, president and CEO of NAACP, speaks at the NAACP national convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati. The convention's theme of “Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count” underscored the need to defend black voting rights and to get out the black vote in the first election since black turnout helped Barack Obama twice win the presidency. (Cara Owsley/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES

    NAACP: Trump, Clinton need black support to win presidency

    CINCINNATI (AP) — Civil rights activists frustrated by police slayings of blacks across the nation are looking to flex their voting power to push for reforms.

  • The Latest: ACLU: letter ban never should have been proposed

    BALTIMORE (AP) — The Latest on a state of Maryland proposal to impose the nation’s first total ban on letters sent to prisoners at state facilities (all times local):

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • This frame grab made from a video posted on YouTube on July 10, 2016, shows Gavin Eugene Long speaking as his online persona Cosmo Setepenra. Long killed law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday, July 17, 2016. (YouTube via AP)

    Friends recall slain officers as residents gather to mourn

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The man who ambushed and killed three law enforcement officers in Louisiana purportedly described his actions as a “necessary evil” in a self-described, handwritten manifesto that an Ohio man says was emailed to him by the gunman less than an hour before the shootings.

  • Caitlyn Jenner, right, speaks at an American Unity Fund brunch at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland on July 20, 2016, on the sidelines of the Republican National Convention. Jenner said it was easier to come out as transgender than it was as a Republican. The transgender activist and Olympic gold medalist is speaking at a breakfast at the Republican National Convention to promote LGBT inclusion in the GOP.  On the dais with Jenner is Margaret Hoover of the American Unity Fund.  (AP Photo/Josh Lederman)

    Caitlyn Jenner: Easier to come out as trans than Republican

    CLEVELAND (AP) — Prodding her party, Caitlyn Jenner said Wednesday it was easier to come out as transgender than as a Republican and conceded Democrats promote more inclusive policies.

  • In this Sunday, July 17, 2016 file photo, Baton Rouge Police investigate the scene in Baton Rouge, La., where several law enforcement officers were killed and wounded. Back-to-back attacks on police in Texas and Louisiana by former military men have touched a nerve among veterans who traditionally share a close bond with law enforcement. Veterans and active-duty troops started posting messages on social media almost immediately after the news broke this weekend that a masked ex-Marine had ambushed law enforcement along a busy highway, killing three officers - including a fellow former Marine. (Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP, File)

    Police shootings touch nerve among military veterans

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Back-to-back attacks on police in Texas and Louisiana by former military men have touched a nerve among veterans who traditionally share a close bond with law enforcement.

  • A Code Pink activist is covered by American flags during the second day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

    AP EXPLAINS: Why do Republicans say sky is falling? Is it?

    The United States depicted at the Republican National Convention is a scary place. It is wrenched by economic uncertainty, social upheaval, political dysfunction, runaway immigration, violent streets and existential threats from abroad. Republicans want voters to see the need for drastic change. The nation’s only choice, they say, is Donald Trump.

  • In this June 29, 2016 photo, 3-year-old, Devon Quinn, rests in his hospital bed after being shot while sitting in a car with his father on Father's Day after visiting relatives in Chicago. With a spike in killings and shootings this year in Chicago, statistics show more bullets are hitting children as they do normal kid things like play with sparklers, draw on the sidewalk or hold a mother’s hand. (Brian Jackson/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)

    Gunfire often connected to gangs hitting Chicago children

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago mother thought she knew when it was safe to take her children outside, that her ability to size up and avoid people trouble seemed to follow would protect them.

  • Amos helps kids turn their lives around

    ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — Post-traumatic stress disorder, commonly known as PTSD, brought Tim Amos to his career.

  • In this Nov. 22, 2015 FILE photo, Yale's Jack Montague, right, passes the ball around SMU's Markus Kennedy during an NCAA college basketball game in Dallas. Montague's attorney said he was expelled from Yale in Feb. 2016, because of a sexual assault allegation. Montague filed a federal lawsuit over the expulsion, alleging the school mishandled information that originated with someone other than the alleged victim. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

    Should schools punish in sex cases when there’s no accuser?

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The expulsion of two college athletes on sexual misconduct grounds highlights a little-known facet of the latitude schools are given when investigating such cases: They can mete out punishment even in the absence of a complaint from the alleged victim.