• FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops on July 8 had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group, the public response was spontaneous and massive. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group on July 8, the public response was spontaneous and unprecedented. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • FILE- In this June 9, 2016 file photo, Arthur B. Johnson Jr., of Baltimore, demonstrates alone outside Baltimore's Courthouse East on the first day of the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, in Baltimore. More than a year after Freddie Gray's death, the same streets that exploded in fury and flame are calm. Despite back-to-back acquittals for officers charged in Gray's death, the physical protest movement that helped topple the careers of both the police commissioner and the mayor has dissipated, leaving activists exploring other avenues for change. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)

    Weary of protest, Baltimore activists seek change elsewhere

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Under the beating summer sun, retired steelworker Arthur B. Johnson Jr. stood outside the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore, clutching the fraying wooden handle of a homemade sign.

  • In this Feb. 13, 2014, file photo, a worker attaches a banner to a scaffolding in New Orleans in preparation of the NBA All-Star basketball game. The league took the 2017 game out of Charlotte on Thursday, July 21, 2016,  because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the hundred million or so dollars they would bring to the local economy. New Orleans is the favorite, with one official familiar with the discussions telling The Associated Press that the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

    Blame game follows NBA’s removal of Charlotte All-Star game

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NBA All-Star Game’s exit from North Carolina because of a law limiting protections for LGBT people represents some of the worst publicity yet for Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s re-election campaign, even as he dismisses the move as political correctness gone too far.

  • Survey: Fewer teens drinking alcohol, smoking in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A recent state survey has found that New Mexico teenagers are consuming less alcohol as well as smoking fewer cigarettes.

  • In this Saturday, June 25, 2016 photo, Cub Scouts watch a race during the Second Annual World Championship Pinewood Derby in New York's Times Square. Nearly 12 months after the Boy Scouts of America National Executive Board's decision to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults, the Boy Scouts seem more robust than they have in many years. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Boy Scouts faring well a year after easing ban on gay adults

    NEW YORK (AP) — There were dire warnings for the Boy Scouts of America a year ago when the group’s leaders, under intense pressure, voted to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults. Several of the biggest sponsors of Scout units, including the Roman Catholic, Mormon and Southern Baptist churches, were openly dismayed, raising the prospect of mass defections.

  • A portrait is displayed as colleagues and people gather at the coffin of Pavel Sheremet to pay their respects at his memorial ceremony in Kiev, Ukraine, Friday, July 22, 2016. Hundreds of local residents and journalists have come to pay their respects to a prominent journalist who died in a car bombing in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev earlier this week. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

    Journalist who died in Ukraine car bombing buried in Belarus

    MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Prominent journalist Pavel Sheremet, who died when his car was bombed in Ukraine, has been buried in his hometown of Minsk, Belarus.

  • Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., listens to community leaders at a roundtable discussion on religious freedom with the regional interfaith community at All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Mosque in Sterling, Va., Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

    Kaine liberal appeal muted by energy ties, abortion concerns

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine are closely aligned on many issues, but Kaine’s cautious, left-leaning political profile in a closely contested state is blurred by his ties to energy industry interests and his personal qualms over abortion.

  • CAPTION CORRECTION: CORRECTS NAME OF PHOTOGRAPHER TO MASSOUD HOSSAINI -- A bloodied man who carried dead and wounded, speaks on the phone at the site of a suicide attack an explosion that struck a protest march, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, July 23, 2016. Witnesses in Kabul say that an explosion causing multiple casualties struck the march by members of Afghanistan’s largely Shiite Hazara ethnic minority group, who were demanding that a major regional electric power line be routed through their impoverished home province. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

    The Latest: Afghan official: Bombing death toll rises to 61

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Latest on the deadly bombing of a mass demonstration by members of Afghanistan’s ethnic Hazara minority in the capital, Kabul (all times local):

  • In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, a woman looks at a handgun at the Glock booth at the Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Nearly two-thirds of Americans expressed support for stricter gun laws, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll released Saturday, July 23, 2016. A majority of poll respondents oppose banning handguns. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

    AP-GfK poll finds clear divisions in views on gun limits

    A new poll shows that Americans generally support some of the most often-proposed limits on gun ownership, including universal background checks and banning semi-automatic weapons such as the AR-15.