• Veterans help fill gaps in refugee school projects in Iraq

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A nonprofit group with New Hampshire roots is putting a new spin on back-to-school shopping by helping equip 10 classrooms for refugee children in Iraq.

  • Max Ritvo, poet who chronicled cancer battle, dies at 25

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Max Ritvo, a poet who chronicled his long battle with cancer in works that were both humorous and searing, has died. He was 25.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures with a fist bump during his visit to the Philippine Army's Camp Mateo Capinpin at Tanay township, Rizal province east of Manila, Philippines. Since Duterte unleashed a massive anti-drug crackdown after taking office barely two months ago, nearly 2,000 suspected drug pushers and users have been killed. He has called the pope a son of a bitch, the U.S. ambassador gay, the United Nations inutile, and threatened to declare martial law if the Supreme Court meddles in his work. But, according to a survey early last month, he has the support of nearly 91 percent of Filipinos. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

    Filipinos seen backing Duterte despite rising drug killings

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — On the day he was sworn into office, President Rodrigo Duterte went to a Manila slum and exhorted residents who knew any drug addicts to “go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.”

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • FILE- In this July 29, 2016, file photo, Chicago Bulls player Dwyane Wade speaks during a news conference in Chicago. A family spokesman says a cousin of Wade's was fatally shot Friday, Aug. 25, while pushing a baby in a stroller on the city's South Side. Wade posted on Twitter: "My cousin was killed today in Chicago. Another act of senseless gun violence. 4 kids lost their mom for NO REASON. Unreal." (AP Photo/Tae-Gyun Kim, File)

    Dwyane Wade’s cousin fatally shot pushing baby in stroller

    CHICAGO (AP) — NBA star Dwyane Wade’s cousin was an innocent bystander, police said, pushing her baby in a stroller near a Chicago school where she intended to register her children when she was fatally shot Friday.

  • Prevot suspended indefinitely by No. 24 Oregon

    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — Defensive end Torrodney Prevot has been suspended indefinitely by No. 24 Oregon for violating the university’s and athletic department’s code of conduct.

  • Ex-wife says Trump campaign CEO made anti-Semitic remarks

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — An ex-wife of Donald Trump’s new campaign CEO, Stephen Bannon, said Bannon made anti-Semitic remarks when the two battled over sending their daughters to private school nearly a decade ago, according to court papers reviewed Friday by The Associated Press.

  • Correction: Hospital Superbug Outbreak story

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a Feb. 20, 2015 story about an antibiotic-resistant “superbug” outbreak at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, The Associated Press mischaracterized a statement an expert made about proving the cause of an infection. Lawrence Muscarella, a health care and sterilization expert, said he was suggesting an argument hospitals might use when he said, “Proving causation is impossible.” Muscarella said an infection can be proven to come from a hospital instrument.

  • FILE- In this April 20, 2015, file photo, a sidewalk leads to the South Building on campus at The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C. A federal judge ruled Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, that two students and an employee must be allowed to use restrooms matching their gender identity at University of North Carolina campuses, and he said they have a strong chance of proving the state's bathroom-access measure violates federal law, a judicial rebuke that transgender rights advocates hailed as a victory. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

    Judge blocks transgender bathroom law for 3 plaintiffs

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal judge ruled Friday that two students and an employee must be allowed to use restrooms matching their gender identity at University of North Carolina campuses, and he said they have a strong chance of proving the state’s bathroom-access measure violates federal law, a judicial rebuke that transgender rights advocates hailed as a victory.

  • Judge: North Carolina university can’t block 2 transgender students, employee from using bathroom of their choice

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Judge: North Carolina university can’t block 2 transgender students, employee from using bathroom of their choice.