• In this April 1, 2016 photo, a worker swipe the "Beijing Connect" old person's card for a customer at a steamed bread store in a supermarket in Beijing. When people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population. The data amassed with each swipe of the multi-purpose "Beijing Connect" old person’s card goes into a massive database of the elderly in the capital. City authorities hope the information will enable them to better cope with their burgeoning population of over-60s, which already stands at 3 million. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Beijing tracks the elderly as they take buses, go shopping

    BEIJING (AP) — These days, when people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population.

  • In this March 1, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at the Signature Flight Hangar at Port-Columbus International Airport in Columbus, Ohio. China features prominently in the rhetoric of presumed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, who accuses the country of stealing American jobs and cheating at global trade. In China itself, though, he’s only now emerging as a public figure, despite a notoriety elsewhere for his voluble utterances, high-profile businesses and reality TV show. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

    Though largely unknown, Trump finds fans in China

    BEIJING (AP) — China features prominently in the rhetoric of presumed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, who accuses the country of stealing American jobs and cheating at global trade. In China itself, though, he’s only now emerging as a public figure, despite notoriety elsewhere for his voluble utterances, high-profile businesses and reality TV show.

  • Albuquerque’s homeless won’t be target of reverse drug sting

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Albuquerque police say they will no longer set up reverse drug stings involving the homeless.

  • Data show more students leaving public schools for charters

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Urban school districts from Los Angeles to Philadelphia are experiencing declining enrollment in traditional public schools as more parents enroll their children in charters, depleting millions in per-pupil funding from district budgets.

  • In this Jan. 12, 2012, file photo, parent Olivia Samaripa, far right, with her daughter Aria, 2, pull a wagon carrying petitions calling for their school to be converted to a charter school in the Mojave Desert town of Adelanto, Calif. More than 100,000 students in the nation's second-largest school district are now enrolled in charters, draining nearly $592 million from the budget in one school year alone. In Los Angeles, school board members are waging a battle to try and regain the public's trust in district schools. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

    As charters grow, public schools see sharp enrollment drop

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Standing before the Los Angeles Unified School Board, Susan Zoller delivered a startling assessment: More than 100,000 students in the nation’s second-largest district were now enrolled in charters, draining more than $500 million from the budget in a single academic year.

  • In a May 14, 2016 file photo, Mouttet from the Corpus Christi Utilities Department collects a sample of water to test on the corner of Claremore St. and Kentner St. in Corpus Christi, Texas. The Texas Gulf Coast city has issued three orders in less than a year telling residents to boil their water to ensure it’s safe to consume, including a two-week order this month that sparked outrage, contributed to the city manager’s resignation and renewed questions about how to fix the problem.  (Gabe Hernandez/Corpus Christi Caller-Times via AP, File)

    Boil-water alerts in Texas on the rise for many reasons

    DALLAS (AP) — A glass of drinking water hasn’t been easy to come by lately for the 320,000 people in Corpus Christi.

  • In this Friday, May 27, 2016 photo, Jill Breen, a midwife, examines 10-week-old Maggie Dickson while her parents Jamie and Shannon Dickson look on, at their home in Waterville, Maine. New rules will require midwives to be licensed by the state while also setting educational requirements and standards for data collection with an eye toward improving safety. Breen said she fears the licensure system will drive some midwives who don't complete it underground. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

    New Maine midwifery rules reflect licensure drive around US

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine’s midwives will face a new set of rules designed to make homebirth safer as a result of a bill that reflects changes to the profession around the country.

    Updated: 1:30 pm

  • In this Nov. 28, 2015 file photo Bayern's Jerome Boateng controls the ball during the German Bundesliga soccer match between FC Bayern Munich and Hertha BSC Berlin at the Allianz Arena stadium in Munich, Germany. Alexander Gauland, deputy leader of Alternative for Germany, was quoted Sunday, May 29, 2016, as telling the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper: “People find him good as a footballer. But they don’t want to have a Boateng as their neighbor.” (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader, file)

    German nationalist slammed over black soccer player comment

    BERLIN (AP) — A top member of a rising German nationalist party drew sharp criticism Sunday for reportedly saying that many people wouldn’t want Jerome Boateng, a key player on Germany’s national soccer team whose father was born in Ghana, as their neighbor.

  • In this photo taken Friday, April 22, 2016 resident Mouaz Abdullah Ibrahim of Iraq poses for a photo after an interview with The Associated Press at a refugee shelter in Berlin, Germany. Ibrahim fled Baiji last year amid fierce fighting between government forces and Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German rhetoric on Afghan migrants doesn’t meet reality

    BERLIN (AP) — The 75 people stuffed onto the small dinghy watched with horror as the water flowed in, eventually covering bags filled with clothes and mementos from the devastated homes they were fleeing. Jawad, a 25-year-old Afghan, prayed as he huddled with his wife, daughter and infant son.

  • In this May 25, 2016 file photo made available by the Italian Navy, people try to jump in the water right before their boat overturns off the Libyan coast. Over 700 migrants are feared dead in three Mediterranean Sea shipwrecks south of Italy in the last few days as they tried desperately to reach Europe in unseaworthy smuggling boats, the U.N. refugee agency said Sunday, May 29, 2016. (Italian navy via AP Photo, file)

    UN: 700 migrants feared dead in Mediterranean shipwrecks

    POZZALLO, Sicily (AP) — Survivor accounts have pushed to more than 700 the number of migrants feared dead in Mediterranean Sea shipwrecks over three days in the past week, even as European ships saved thousands of others in daring rescue operations.