• In this Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, shakes hands with Elaine Chiechon while visiting the Chez Vachon restaurant in Manchester, N.H. Small business issues like taxes and regulations are expected to get more attention in the presidential race after the formal nominations as the post-convention campaigns intensify. Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton have different takes on what small business needs as they make their appeal to company owners. But an expert says that like many Americans, owners are likely to vote based on how they feel about the two candidates. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    Expect focus on small business to grow in presidential race

    NEW YORK (AP) — Expect more talk about small business issues like taxes and regulations as the post-convention presidential campaigns intensify, with Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton trying to woo entrepreneurs and show they know what company owners need.

  • Correction: San Francisco-Foam Ban story

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a story July 9 about a comprehensive ban on foam products in San Francisco, The Associated Press reported erroneously the nature and timing of bans in other cities. Los Angeles has a ban on foam food containers only in government buildings. And Portland, Oregon, approved a ban on such products in restaurants in1989, not following a similar prohibition in San Francisco in 2006.

  • This June 24, 2016, photo, provided by NerdWallet shows Brianna McGurran, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. “Ask Brianna” is a Q&A column for 20-somethings, or anyone else starting out. (Jazeena Baeza/NerdWallet via AP)

    Ask Brianna: How should I spend my first full-time paycheck?

    “Ask Brianna” is a Q&A column for 20-somethings, or anyone else starting out. I’m here to help you manage your money, find a job and pay off student loans — all the real-world stuff no one taught us how to do in college. Send your questions about postgrad life to [email protected]

  • This photo provided by NerdWallet shows Liz Weston. Weston is a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. Financial planners often suggest saving as if you’ll live to see your 100th birthday. But that means you’ll need a nest egg about 40 percent larger than what you’d need for a normal life expectancy. Don’t get overwhelmed and give up. Just get savvy about your individual situation. (Dylan Entelis/NerdWallet via AP)

    Should You Save Enough to Live to 100?

    First, you were supposed to die at 85. Then 90. Now 95 and even 100 are common defaults when financial planners tell people how much to save for retirement.