• In this April 29, 2016, image made from video provided by Cat TV host Koo Eun-je, stray cats approach foods prepared by South Korean Koo Eun-je, the 35-year-old host of the online Cat TV, at "a restaurant for cats" in JeollaNamdo, South Korea. The stars of the latest online trend in South Korea are stray cats, eating food left out for them as viewers sit enrapt at their feline charms. Koo's livestreamed “Cats Meok Bang” show is a twist on an online trend of young South Korean men and women tucking into feasts in real time, while viewers send messages and sometimes virtual cash. In a country where young adults increasingly live and dine alone, the shows have become so popular, some hosts have made small or big fortunes from the virtual cash sent from viewers. (Cat TV host Koo Eun-je via AP) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

    South Korea’s latest online celebrities: Stray cats eating

    JANGSEONG, South Korea (AP) — The stars of the latest online trend in South Korea stay out of sight most of the day. Viewers don’t seem to mind waiting for hours while nothing happens. When the stray cats finally come to eat the food left out for them, people watching online sit enrapt at their feline charms.

  • In this Feb. 3, 2016, file photo, Cho Yang-ho, president of the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics Organizing Committee, speaks during a press conference about the alpine skiing test event for the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics in Jeongseon, at the Press Center in Seoul, South Korea. Cho quit on Tuesday, May 3, 2016, amid escalating financial troubles at the business group his family controls. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon. File)

    South Korean 2018 Olympic chief quits over company trouble

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A former South Korean government minister was nominated to take over the organizing committee of the 2018 Winter Olympics on Tuesday, just hours after Cho Yang-ho quit amid escalating financial troubles at the business group his family controls.

  • In this Oct. 1, 2015, file photo, people attend the opening ceremony of the Busan International Film Festival at Busan Cinema Center in Busan, South Korea. The future of Asia’s largest, most-awaited film festival is in question as local filmmakers threaten to boycott the red carpet over what they view as government interference. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

    Feud over artistic independence threatens Asian film fest

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The future of Asia’s largest, most-awaited film festival is in question as South Korean filmmakers threaten to boycott the red carpet over what they view as government interference.

  • An employee displays a popular North Korean street food snack called Injogogibap in Korean at a restaurant in Incheon, South Korea, Friday, April 15, 2016. For much of the world, North Korea is known as an isolated enclave of prison camps, poverty and hunger. But for tens of thousands of people scattered across South Korea and living underground in China, it’s a complicated memory of their home they left behind. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Yearning for North Korea – the nation they fled

    INCHEON, South Korea (AP) — For much of the world, North Korea is a Stalinist nightmare, an isolated enclave of prison camps, poverty and hunger.

  • A currency trader walks by the screen showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, April 29, 2016. Asian stocks were mixed Friday after Wall Street slid and Japan's central bank surprised markets by putting off possible additional stimulus. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Asian stocks mixed after Wall Street slide

    BEIJING (AP) — Global stock markets mostly fell Friday after Wall Street slid and Japan’s central bank surprised markets by putting off possible additional stimulus.