• U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the Ujibashi bridge as they visit the Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan Thursday, May 26, 2016 , ahead of the first session of the G-7 summit meetings. When Obama and Abe make a historic visit to Hiroshima - the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited the site of the first atomic bomb attack - their words advocating nuclear disarmament will clash with real-world security necessities. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP)

    Nuclear-free aspirations of Obama, Abe conflict with reality

    TOBA, Japan (AP) — There is the soaring rhetoric. And then there’s the messy reality.

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • In this Feb. 18, 2016 file photo, North Korean performers entertain customers at the Okryugwan restaurant in Beijing, China. An unspecified number of North Koreans working at an unidentified Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The announcement by Seoul's Unification Ministry came after South Korean media reported that two or three female employees at an unspecified North Korean-run restaurant in China fled and went to an unidentified Southeast Asian country earlier this month. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan. File)

    South Korea: Overseas North Korean restaurant workers flee

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — An unspecified number of North Koreans working at a Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday.

  • In this Feb. 18, 2016 file photo, North Korean performers entertain customers at the Okryugwan restaurant in Beijing, China. An unspecified number of North Koreans working at an unidentified Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The announcement by Seoul's Unification Ministry came after South Korean media reported that two or three female employees at an unspecified North Korean-run restaurant in China fled and went to an unidentified Southeast Asian country earlier this month. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan. File)

    Seoul: Overseas N. Korean restaurant workers flee

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — An unspecified number of North Koreans working at a Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday.