• In this Aug. 13, 2014 file photo, workers sit at desks at a call center in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico. If you spend all day sitting, then you might want to schedule some time for a brisk walk - just make sure you can spare at least an hour. Scientists analyzing data from more than 1 million people found that it takes about 60 to 75 minutes of “moderate intensity” exercise to undo the damage of sitting for at least eight hours a day. Not exercising and sitting all day is as dangerous as being obese or smoking, they found. (AP Photo/Alex Cossio, File)

    To reverse damage of sitting, take a brisk, hour-long walk

    LONDON (AP) — If you spend all day sitting, then you might want to schedule some time for a brisk walk — just make sure you can spare at least an hour.

  • This Oct. 1, 2014, file photo shows a black-footed ferret peeking out of a tube after being brought to a ranch near Williams, Ariz. The endangered weasel is returning to an area of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Biologists plan to release 35 black-footed ferrets Tuesday, July 26, 2016, near Meeteetse, Wyo. Scientists thought the black-footed ferret was extinct until a dog brought a dead one home near Meeteetse in 1981. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    MEETEETSE, Wyo. (AP) — A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago.

  • In this undated image provided by Amanda Thompson with the University of Georgia shows archeologists Chester DePratter, left, with the University of South Carolina and Victor Thompson, right, of the University of Georgia, running ground penetrating radar across a land grid. Archaeologists have found the location of a long-sought Spanish fort on the South Carolina coast near Beaufort. The location of San Marcos, one of five forts that operated during the 21-year history of the early Spanish settlement of Santa Elena, has been found on Parris Island. (Amanda Thompson/University of Georgia via AP)

    Remains of lost Spanish fort found on South Carolina coast

    PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — Archaeologists have found the location of a long-sought Spanish fort on the South Carolina coast at the site of what was once the first capital of Spanish Florida.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • Up there: Netherlands, Latvia lead world for people’s height

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you want to see a tall population of men, go to the Netherlands. Tall women? Latvia.

  • Dine College to add 3 new degree programs

    FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — Dine (dee-NAY’) College in adding three bachelor degree programs as part of an ongoing effort to expand the school’s undergraduate offerings.

  • In this photo taken Thursday, July 21, 2016, farmer John Lavoie walks through drying strawberry patch in Hollis, N.H. Parts of the Northeast are in the grips of a drought that has led to water restrictions, wrought havoc on gardens and raised concerns among farmers. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    West Coast style weather strikes Northeastern US

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — At Lavoie’s Farm in New Hampshire, beans and corn haven’t broken through the ground yet and fields of strawberries are stunted.

  • In this July 20, 2016, photo, Dave Ambrose, left, and Nate Robinnson, right, use shovels to move piles of whelk shells with tiny oysters growing on them on a boat in Little Egg Harbor, N.J. Efforts to restore once-abundant oyster populations are underway throughout the United States, and researchers and volunteers say they are optimistic the small-scale efforts will pave the way for a major comeback of oysters, whose populations have dwindled drastically from levels seen in the 1800s. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    Maturing oyster recovery projects bring calls for money

    LITTLE EGG HARBOR, N.J. (AP) — Oysters were once so abundant in New Jersey that vacationers would clamber off trains, wade into the water and pluck handfuls to roast for dinner. Their colonies piled so high that boats would sometimes run aground on them, and they were incorporated into navigation maps. Even earlier, Native American tribes would have oyster feasts on the banks of coastal inlets.

  • This Wednesday, April 24, 2002 photo shows a gel image of the DNA of 96 horses displayed on a computer monitor at the UC Davis veterinary genetics lab in Davis, Calif. DNA is an information-storing molecule; the genes passed from generation to generation transmit the blueprints for creating the organism. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

    Scientists work toward storing digital information in DNA

    NEW YORK (AP) — Her computer, Karin Strauss says, contains her “digital attic” — a place where she stores that published math paper she wrote in high school, and computer science schoolwork from college.

  • In this July 2007 file photo, a loon with a chick on its back makes its way across Pierce Pond near North New Portland, Maine. Generations have passed since common loons could be seen throughout Massachusetts. But a Maine-based conservation group is out to change that with a plan to transplant loon chicks to Massachusetts during the summer of 2106. (AP Photo/Pat Wellenbach, File)

    Conservationists hope to bring beloved bird back

    WINDHAM, Maine (AP) — The common loon’s haunting wail that pierced the dusk on Massachusetts lakes disappeared long ago.