• A federal police agent leads a handcuffed suspect who authorities say was arrested on terrorism-related charges in Brasilia, Brazil, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Ten Brazilians, who according to authorities pledged allegiance to the Islamic State militant group, were arrested Thursday. Authorities also described them as "amateurs" who discussed on social media the possibility of staging attacks during next month's Olympics.  (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil arrests 10 in alleged Olympics terror plot

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Ten Brazilians who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State militant group were arrested Thursday, authorities announced, describing them as “amateurs” who discussed on social media the possibility of staging attacks during next month’s Olympics.

  • IOC acts to protect Olympic athletes from Games-time abuse

    LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — The International Olympic Committee says a welfare officer will be assigned to the athletes’ village in Rio de Janeiro to coordinate any reports of harassment or abuse during the games next month.

  • In this May 8, 2015 file photo, lab technicians work at the Brazilian Doping Control Laboratory (LBCD) before a visit by Brazil's sports minister in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The World Anti-Doping Agency said Wednesday, June 20, 2016, it has reaccredited the LBCD, the lab that will do drug testing for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, which start in just over two weeks. The anti-doping laboratory was suspended in June 2016 for "nonconformity with International Standard for Laboratories." (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    WADA reinstates Rio Olympic drug-testing laboratory

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The World Anti-Doping Agency said Wednesday it has reinstated the laboratory that will carry out drug testing for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, which start in just over two weeks.

  • World Anti-Doping Agency approves Rio de Janeiro testing laboratory in time for Olympics

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — World Anti-Doping Agency approves Rio de Janeiro testing laboratory in time for Olympics .

  • In this Nov. 24, 2015 file photo, police officers patrol the Grand Place in central Brussels. Between terror attacks, Zika and mass shootings, there's lots of bad news about popular destinations around the world. Where does that leave travelers who may want to stay home instead of going through with a trip? It depends on the circumstances. Cancel-for-any-reason insurance is expensive to buy but provides refunds if you change your mind about a trip. Standard trip insurance may also cover cancellations to a destination hit by terrorism for a period of days following an attack. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Can insurance help if you cancel a trip out of fear?

    NEW YORK (AP) — Spooked by headlines about Zika, terrorism and mass shootings? Maybe the news is so bad you’re ready to cancel your vacation and stay home. But can you recoup what you paid for flights, lodging, car rentals and tours?

  • In this May 20, 2016 file photo, Olympic tickets are displayed during an event at the Rio 2016 headquarters in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Non-Brazilians who bought Olympic tickets early may be regretting it, having paid higher prices and add-on fees. In a last-minute push to boost slow ticket sales, Rio organizers recently opened up their local ticket website to the entire world. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Olympic tickets: Prices could drop for non-Brazilian buyers

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Sports fans living outside Brazil who bought tickets for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics early may be regretting it, having paid higher prices and add-on fees.

  • Russian stars who could miss the Rio Olympics

    MOSCOW (AP) — The International Olympic Committee says it is exploring the legal options for a possible ban of the entire Russian team from next month’s Olympics in Rio de Janeiro as a result of the country’s repeated doping scandals. Russia finished fourth in the gold medal table at the 2012 Olympics in London and third in the overall medal table. Its absence in Rio would shake up both tables. Here are five Russian stars who could miss out:

  • The sun rises behind the Christ the Redeemer statue, above the Guanabara bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. With the Olympics set to start on Aug. 5, the games and the city have been overshadowed by security threats, violence, the Zika virus and a national political corruption scandal. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Poll: Many Brazilians think Olympic Games cause more harm

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A new poll says nearly two out of three Brazilians believe that hosting the Summer Games will cause the country more harm than good.

  • In this July 15, 2016 photo, caipirinha vendor Wanderlei Silva Santos explains how he communicates to foreign tourists his prices in the sand on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Santos, who sells Brazil's national cocktail, says he struggles to communicate with foreign tourists who stop at his stand on Copacabana Beach, so he uses his fingers and toes to write prices and shapes in the sand. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Visiting Rio for the Olympics? Get your Portuguese ready

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — If English is the language of world commerce, Brazil hasn’t gotten the memo — only a small fraction of its 200 million people have a basic proficiency. Fluency is also rare for other languages such as German, French and even Spanish, despite Brazil being bordered by seven Spanish-speaking countries.

  • Mexico prepares athletes for health risks at Rio Olympics

    MEXICO CITY (AP) — Epidemiologists from Mexico’s public health agency will accompany the country’s athletes to the Olympic Games for the first time this summer.