• Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis listens to a customer following her office's refusal to issue marriage licenses at the Rowan County Courthouse in Morehead, Ky., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Although her appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was denied, Davis still refuses to issue marriage licenses. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)

    Religion news in brief

    Federal hearing set in clerk’s marriage case

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015, file photo, Pope Francis waves as arrives for his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican. Francis, speaking Monday, Aug. 31, 2015, from Rome via satellite to people in three American cities, asked a teenage girl to sing for him as he sought prayers for his upcoming trip to the United States. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, File)

    A primer on where pope stands on gays, divorce, climate

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis is expected to raise issues ranging from climate change to income inequality when he visits Cuba and the United States Sept. 19-27. Francis has launched an agenda of reform in the Vatican and in the global church, prioritizing different issues and counseling a more merciful message. Here’s a primer on where the pope stands on key issues.

  • This Aug. 12, 2015 picture shows ascupture representing  Jan Karski, a Polish World War II-era resistance fighter, in Warsaw,  A Polish-American Holocaust survivor plans to build a memorial in the heart of the Warsaw ghetto to the thousands of Polish gentiles who rescued Jews during the war.         (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Poland’s mixed feelings over memorial to rescuers of Jews

    WARSAW, Poland (AP) — As a Catholic Pole, Elka shouldn’t even have been in the ghetto of Czestochowa, in southern Poland. But the nanny was so devoted to the 12-year-old Jewish boy she had raised since infancy that she refused to leave. She ended up being sent to the Treblinka death camp — where she was murdered with the Jews.

  • Marwa Fahmy wife of Canadian Al-Jazeera English journalist Mohammed Fahmy, bursts into tears, as she is watched by human rights lawyer Amal Clooney, after the verdict in a courtroom in Tora prison in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015. An Egyptian court on Saturday sentenced three Al-Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison, the last twist in a long-running trial criticized worldwide by press freedom advocates and human rights activists. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

    3 Al-Jazeera English reporters await Egyptian court ruling

    CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court sentenced three Al-Jazeera English journalists to three years in prison on Saturday for broadcasting “false news,” sparking an international outcry and underlining how authorities are trampling over free speech just over a year into general-turned-politician Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi’s presidency.

  • FILE -- In this August 22, file photo, a Lebanese activist holds a poster with pictures of Lebanese Cabinet ministers during a protest against the ongoing trash crisis, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon. To the casual visitor, Lebanon may look like a relative success story: a tiny slice of modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism _ but the reality is quite different. For residents, it’s a failed state  eaten away by a sectarian political class, and while recent trash protests have challenged that system, others argue it’s what’s allowed a country of 4.5 million people from 18 recognized sects to survive. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein, File)

    Lebanon: Shiny on the outside, rotting from the inside

    BEIRUT (AP) — To the casual visitor, Lebanon may seem like a tiny slice of Mediterranean modernity and coexistence in a turbulent region plagued by violence and extremism.