• In this photo taken Thursday, July 21, 2016, Anthony Villarreal ties his running shoe at his home in Citrus Heights, Calif. Villarreal had been a long distance runner for William Jessup University's country and track teams, before he was expelled in 2013, which, he says, was because the school found out he is gay. Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens introduced SB1146 which would expand state LGBT protections by removing the state's exemption for religious colleges and universities for anti-discrimination policies. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    Bill would prevent LGBT discrimination at religious schools

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The conflict between religious freedom and gay rights has a new battleground — California’s religious colleges and universities.

    Updated: 12:43 pm

  • In this Wednesday, July 20, 2016 photo, Israeli Dani Dayan speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Jerusalem. For years, Dani Dayan was the West Bank settler movement’s face to the outside world. Next week, he’ll become the face of Israel to much of North America. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

    Israeli settler-turned-diplomat to take new post in New York

    JERUSALEM (AP) — For years, Dani Dayan was the West Bank settler movement’s face to the outside world. Next week, he’ll become the face of Israel to much of North America.

  • This Wednesday, July 20, 2016 file picture shows soldiers patrolling the famed Promenade des Anglais in Nice, southern France. Since January 2015, IS-inspired attackers have killed at least 235 people in France, by far the largest casualty rate of any Western country. (AP Photo/Claude Paris, File)

    Many factors make France the top IS terror target in Europe

    PARIS (AP) — When militants loyal to the Islamic State group seek to inflict pain on Europe, France is their preferred target, a grim reality borne out yet again with Tuesday’s knife slaughter of a Catholic priest.

  • This is an undated image of French Priest Jacques Hamel made available by the Catholic Diocese if Rouen in France on Tuesday July 26, 2016. Priest Jacques Hamel was killed on Tuesday when two attackers slit the throat of the 86-year-old  priest who was celebrating Mass Saint-Etienne-du-Rouvray, in France, killing him and gravely injured another of the handful of church-goers present before being shot to death by police. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the first attack in a church in the West. (Doicese of Rouen via AP)

    10 Things to Know for Wednesday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

  • In this Feb. 4, 2016, file photo, Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., gives a 'thumbs-up' as he takes his seat at the head table for the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. Kaine is one of several Democrats that Hillary Clinton is considering for her vice presidential running mate.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

    Kaine brings steady hand, confidence to Clinton ticket

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Nerdy? Sure. Boring? Never.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops on July 8 had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group, the public response was spontaneous and massive. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group on July 8, the public response was spontaneous and unprecedented. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • In this Saturday, June 25, 2016 photo, Cub Scouts watch a race during the Second Annual World Championship Pinewood Derby in New York's Times Square. Nearly 12 months after the Boy Scouts of America National Executive Board's decision to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults, the Boy Scouts seem more robust than they have in many years. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Boy Scouts faring well a year after easing ban on gay adults

    NEW YORK (AP) — There were dire warnings for the Boy Scouts of America a year ago when the group’s leaders, under intense pressure, voted to end a long-standing blanket ban on participation by openly gay adults. Several of the biggest sponsors of Scout units, including the Roman Catholic, Mormon and Southern Baptist churches, were openly dismayed, raising the prospect of mass defections.