• In this Sept. 14, 2015 file photo, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis makes a statement to the media at the front door of the Rowan County Judicial Center in Morehead, Ky. On Friday, Oct. 2, 2015, the Vatican distanced Pope Francis from Kim Davis, the focal point in the gay marriage debate in the U.S., saying she was one of dozens of people the pope greeted in the U.S. and that their Sept. 24 encounter at the Vatican's embassy in Washington "should not be considered a form of support of her position." Davis, an Apostolic Christian, spent five days in jail for defying a series of federal court orders to issue same-sex marriage licenses after the Supreme Court legalized gay marriage across the country.  (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

    Vatican: Pope met with gay student, partner in Davis twist

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican turned the tables Friday on the pope’s meeting with Kim Davis: Not only did it distance the pontiff from her claims that he endorsed her stand on same-sex marriage, it said the only “real audience” Francis had in Washington was with a small group that included a gay couple.

  • In this Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 file photo, Bangladeshi policemen investigate at the site of attack on Bangladeshi-American blogger Avijit Roy, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. A string of slayings claimed by radical Islamist groups has Bangladesh scrambling to contain what appears to be a rising tide of extremism, and it couldnít have come at a worse time -- the countryís fragile economic growth is faltering this year amid renewed political unrest. (AP Photo/Rajib Dhar)

    Murders test Bangladesh claims that radical Islam in control

    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — A string of slayings claimed by radical Islamic groups has Bangladesh scrambling to contain what appears to be a rising tide of extremism, and it couldn’t have come at a worse time — the country’s fragile economic growth is faltering this year amid renewed political unrest.

  • Thursday, October 1, 2015

    The Latest: Oregon college cancels classes all of next week; 9 victims are identified

  • AP10ThingsToSee - Muslims offer prayers at the Jama Masjid during Eid al-Adha in New Delhi, India on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice, by sacrificing animals to commemorate the prophet Ibrahim's faith in being willing to sacrifice his son. (AP Photo/Tsering Topgyal)

    10 Things to See: A week of top AP photos

    Here’s your look at highlights from the weekly AP photo report, a gallery featuring a mix of front-page photography, the odd image you might have missed and lasting moments our editors think you should see.

  • Vatican cricket team to play Muslim, Argentine slum clubs

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican is expanding the reach of its cricket club this season, hosting a Muslim team from Yorkshire and a club from the same Buenos Aires slum where Jorge Mario Bergoglio ministered before becoming Pope Francis.

  • Republican presidential candidate and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson signs his book during a campaign stop at the University of New Hampshire Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015, in Durham, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    Carson raising millions to become ’16 fundraising juggernaut

    RANDLEMAN, N.C. (AP) — She had never before given more than a few hundred dollars to a politician. But two weeks ago, Jacquelyn Monroe, a single mother who plays the piano for a living, decided to raise $100,000 for Ben Carson.

  • French peacekeeping soldiers patrol the city of Bangui, Central African Republic, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2015.  42 deaths have been confirmed in Bangui since sectarian clashes erupted on Saturday between rivaling Christian and Muslim militias, but it is too dangerous for aid organizations to collect the bodies or help the wounded, according to Antoine Mbao-Bogo of The Red Cross. (AP Photo)

    Red Cross: Wounded trapped in C. African Republic capital

    BANGUI, Central African Republic (AP) — Aid officials pleaded for access to the neighborhoods of Central African Republic’s treacherous capital on Wednesday, saying that sectarian clashes between rivaling Christian and Muslim militias make it too dangerous to help the wounded and to recover bodies.

  • In this Wednesday Sept. 23, 2015 file photo, Burkina Faso coup leader Gen. Gilbert Diendere, center, greets people at the airport during the arrival of Niger's President Mahamadou Issoufou for talks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Burkina Faso's army took over the barracks of the presidential guard that carried out a short-lived coup this month, barraging them with gunfire Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015 after they refused to disarm, the government said. Gen. Gilbert Diendere, who led the coup earlier this month but handed power back last week, called on his followers to lay down arms. (AP Photo, File)

    Burkina Faso coup leader in Vatican Embassy

    OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (AP) — The military general who led the short-lived coup in Burkina Faso has sought refuge at the Vatican Embassy, a day after the army opened fire on his supporters in the presidential guard to force them to disarm, a person who works closely with the clergy said Wednesday.

  • Correction: Mormons-History story

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — In a story Sept. 29 about a renovated Mormon history museum, The Associated Press reported erroneously the description of a special theater inside. The theater has a 220-degree screen, not 220 seats.

  • Planned Parenthood Federation of America President Cecile Richards is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015, prior to testifying before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on "Planned Parenthood's Taxpayer Funding."  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    Religion news in brief

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards says she respects the religious beliefs of Americans who oppose abortion, but is glad that her organization can help women who want to terminate their pregnancies.