• Visitors feed dogs at the newly opened Central Zoo in Pyongyang, North Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016. One of the most popular attractions at the zoo might come as a surprise to foreign visitors. Just across the way from the hippopotamus pen and the reptile house, dozens of varieties of dogs _ including schnauzers, German shepherds, Shih Tzus and Saint Bernards _ are on display in the 'dog pavilion.' (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

    Lions, tigers and poodles? Dogs a big draw at Pyongyang zoo

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — Lions, tigers and poodles?

  • In this Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016, file photo, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appears as the Nintendo game character Super Mario during the closing ceremony at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Abe's brief but show-stopping appearance as Super Mario offered a glimpse at Tokyo's plans for the 2020 games. (Yu Nakajima/Kyodo News via AP, File)

    AP Explains: Super Mario’s global appeal

    NEW YORK (AP) — Take that, Pokemon. On Sunday, the Japanese prime minister turned up at the Olympics closing ceremonies to promote the 2020 Tokyo games dressed up as Mario , the eponymous hero of the popular video game series created in 1985.

  • Daily fantasy sports resumes in New York state

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — DraftKings, FanDuel and other daily fantasy sports companies have been cleared to resume business in New York state.

  • In this Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016, file photo, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appears as the Nintendo game character Super Mario during the closing ceremony at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Abe's brief but show-stopping appearance as Super Mario offered a glimpse at Tokyo's plans for the 2020 games. (Yu Nakajima/Kyodo News via AP, File)

    AP Explains: Super Mario’s global appeal

    NEW YORK (AP) — Take that, Pokemon. On Sunday, the Japanese prime minister turned up at the Olympics closing ceremonies to promote the 2020 Tokyo games dressed up as Mario , the eponymous hero of the popular video game series created in 1985.

  • In this Aug. 12, 2016 photo, posters advertising an upcoming Rat Pack tribute show is shown at the Tuscany Suites and Casino in Las Vegas. Although Frank Sinatra's presence in Sin City has faded, fans can still locate pieces of his Las Vegas legacy with a little homework and a desire to look beyond popular, contemporary tourist attractions. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

    The memory of all that: Can you still find Sinatra in Vegas?

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Popular Frank Sinatra tunes in Las Vegas hotel lobbies have been replaced by the likes of Sia and Rihanna. The final tower of the famed Riviera Hotel and Casino has fallen, and the Sands Hotel and Casino is long gone. A tribute show to the Rat Pack draws mainly retirees.

  • Silver medal Ethiopia's Feyisa Lilesa, crosses his arms as he celebrates on the podium after the men's marathon at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

    Ethiopia says protesting marathoner to be welcomed as hero

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — The Ethiopian marathon runner who made an anti-government gesture at the Rio Games while approaching the finish line will not face prosecution upon his return home and will have “a heroic welcome,” a government spokesman said Monday. But it was not clear whether the runner would go back.

  • In this Aug. 15, 2016 photo, photographer Andrew George, right, poses with Nelly Gutierrez, who is featured in George's exhibit, "Right, Before I Die," at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles. The exhibit, which features portraits of people facing serious illnesses, will run until Sept. 30.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

    LA art exhibition look at dying through words, photos

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Four years ago photographer Andrew George approached the medical director of a Los Angeles hospital with an unusual request: He wanted to meet and take photographs of people about to die.

  • Veiled women walk in central Algiers, Wednesday Aug. 10, 2016.  Mosques are going up, women are covering up and bars, restaurants and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.(AP Photo/Ouahab Hebbat)

    Fundamentalists gain ground in Algeria as war memory fades

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — Mosques are going up, women are covering up, and shops selling alcoholic beverages are shutting down in a changing Algeria where, slowly but surely, Muslim fundamentalists are gaining ground.