• 2 papal parades, more passes available after ticket outcry

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — After an outcry over plans to keep most of Pope Francis’ audience at his biggest Philadelphia events several blocks away, organizers Thursday announced the pontiff will parade through downtown twice and said they would set aside 30,000 tickets for the public to get a closer view.

    Updated: 8:34 pm

  • A migrant is detained  in Bicske, Hungary, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. Over 150,000 migrants have reached Hungary this year, most coming through the southern border with Serbia. Many apply for asylum but quickly try to leave for richer EU countries. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

    The Latest: Canada: Syria family didn’t file refugee request

    The latest Thursday on the European migrant crisis (all times GMT):

    Updated: 7:12 pm

  • In this July 5, 2015 file photo, musician Kip Moore performs before the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup series auto race in Daytona Beach, Fla. Last month in Annapolis, Maryland, Moore opened the first of four skate parks that he is helping to fund with the Comeback Kid Skatepark Project, an initiative of his donor-advised charitable fund, Kip’s Kids Fund. Another park opened in San Marcos, Texas, and two more will be opened in Nashville, Tennessee and Boston. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)

    Country singer Kip Moore helps build skate parks for kids

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country singer Kip Moore’s style is more surfboards and skateboards than cowboy boots, so when he wanted to help children from low-income areas, he found inspiration in his own passions.

  • Chinese President Xi Jinping is displayed on a screen as Type 99A2 Chinese battle tanks take part in a parade commemorating the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender during World War II held in front of Tiananmen Gate in Beijing, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China shows rising power in parade marking WWII defeat

    BEIJING (AP) — With fighter jets roaring overhead, China’s leader presided Thursday over a massive parade of tanks, missiles and troops that displayed growing military might, but also pledged to reduce the army by 300,000 troops in a bid to show that his country poses no expansionist threat.

  • Chinese female military personnel march during a parade commemorating the 70th anniversary of Japan's surrender during World War II held in front of Tiananmen Gate, in Beijing, Thursday, Sept. 3, 2015. The spectacle involved more than 12,000 troops, 500 pieces of military hardware and 200 aircraft of various types, representing what military officials say is the Chinese military's most cutting-edge technology. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China marks Japan WWII defeat, shows rising power in parade

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s leader presided over a parade of tanks, missiles and troops that displayed growing military might Thursday as fighter jets roared overhead, but pledged a 300,000 reduction in troops in a bid to show his country poses no expansionist threat.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015 photo, visitors line the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park in northern Arizona. The Grand Canyon and other big national parks are seeing more visitors than usual this year, partly driven by good weather, cheap gas and marketing campaigns. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)

    National parks seeing huge spikes in visitation this year

    GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. (AP) — Visitors heading to the Grand Canyon lately know they are going to get two things when they arrive: breathtaking views and long waits, whether it is to get into the national park itself or to find a parking spot inside. A few frustrated tourists have even turned around and left.

  • In this photo taken Tuesday Aug. 18, 2015, American hunters Steve Schultz, left, from Park Falls, Wisconsin, and Jerry Emhoff from Watervliet, Michigan, right, leave their camp at Melorani Safaris at Olifantsvallei, South Africa to spend the day bow and arrow hunting on the reserve. They will wait in concealed positions near watering holes or mineral licks for hours and, in adrenaline-fueled instances, may kill wildlife with compound bows. By night they will dine on the meat of elands, impalas, warthogs  and other animals in an African safari experience (AP Photo/Denis Farrell)

    South Africa hunting reserve caters to bow and arrow hunters

    OLIFANTSVALLEI, South Africa (AP) — One American bow and arrow hunter who traveled with his wife to a South African wildlife reserve worked as a state trooper for decades. Another hunter went alone after his closest friend, who was going to join him, died shortly before their date of departure from the United States.

  • In this Aug. 22, 2015 file photo, a Chinese military vehicle carrying what appears to be covered short-range ballistic missiles rolls down a main avenue during a rehearsal for a large military parade in Beijing. When China rolls out its latest armaments Thursday, Sept. 3, for a lavish parade commemorating the defeat of Japan in World War II, defense experts and foreign armies will be watching closely for any revelations about new military capabilities. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

    A preview of new gear China’s military showing off at parade

    BEIJING (AP) — When China rolls out its latest armaments Thursday for a lavish parade commemorating the defeat of Japan in World War II, defense experts and foreign armies will be watching closely for any revelations about new military capabilities.

  • Krissi Reeves looks at a display on FIFA at the Mob Museum Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015, in Las Vegas. A display on FIFA corruption titled "The 'Beautiful Game' Turns Ugly"opens at the museum Tuesday. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    FIFA scandal becomes exhibit at Mob Museum in Las Vegas

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Al Capone, with raised eyebrows, appeared to be taking a curious sideways glance at the two-minute video of soccer playing and talk about corruption and crooks.

  • A girl stands with a bouquet of flowers as people wait for Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro to arrive at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II, but high-level representatives from Western democracies are largely absent. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China parade draws Putin, but few other major world leaders

    BEIJING (AP) — Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II. After them, the wattage gets pretty low.