• In this Wednesday, May 18, 2016, photo, Joe Russo, of Medway, Mass., puts a bag of potting soil into a cart while shopping at a Home Depot store location, in Bellingham, Mass. The U.S. economy expanded at a sluggish pace this spring as businesses sharply reduced their stockpiles of goods and spent less on new buildings and equipment, according to information released by the Commerce Department, Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

    US economy grew at tepid 1.1 percent pace in spring

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a sluggish 1.1 percent pace this spring as businesses sharply reduced their stockpiles of goods and spent less on new buildings and equipment. Yet most analysts forecast much faster growth in the summer and fall, fueled by healthy consumer spending.

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. Brazil’s Senate braces for a final showdown in a trial that could overthrow President Rousseff after months of lengthy proceedings in Congress. She is accused of breaking fiscal laws, in managing the federal budget as her government ran out of resources. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil Senate starts impeachment trial of President Rousseff

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s Senate on Thursday began deliberating whether to permanently remove President Dilma Rousseff from office, the final step in a leadership fight that has paralyzed Congress and cast a pall over a nation in the midst of a severe recession.

  • In this Thursday, July 21, 2016, file photo, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi speaks during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, after a meeting of the governing council. The Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have pumped trillions of dollars into global financial markets and taken the radical step of pushing interest rates below zero in Europe and Japan. But the results have been lackluster. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Bold moves, tepid gains: Have central banks met their limit?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The world’s key central banks have worked themselves into contortions to try to rev up economic growth, raise inflation and coax consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • In this July 23, 2016 file photo, the Olympic Village stands ready in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A recession and declining real estate market may spoil Rio’s plans to turn the heart of the Olympic Games into a bustling district with luxury apartments and offices. Thousands of apartments in the athletes village have yet to be sold, and experts worry a similar fate is ahead for Olympic Park.  (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

    Bad economy may spoil future plans for Rio’s Olympic Park

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The celebrations are done and the torch extinguished, but now that the Olympics are gone, Rio is left with questions about what will become of the city’s plan to convert the Olympic Park into a bustling recreational district with luxury apartments and offices.

  • Haydy Morsy of Egypt reacts after falling from the horse as she competes at the equestrian section of the women's modern pentathlon at the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, Aug. 19, 2016.(AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

    Rio Paralympics sees ‘major budget cuts,’ low ticket sales

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Paralympics will go ahead in Rio next month but organizers say deep budget cuts mean one venue will close down, facilities will be dismantled and the workforce will be reduced.