• FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group on July 8, the public response was spontaneous and massive. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • FILE- In this Nov. 9, 1947 file photo, Indian Sikh troops take up roadside positions on the Baramula Road to help force invaders further away from the Kashmir capital, Srinagar. A raid by armed tribesmen from north-western Pakistan forced Maharaja Hari Singh of the Himalayan kingdom of Jammu and Kashmir to seek help from India, which offered military assistance on the condition that the kingdom accede to India. The ruler accepted but insisted that the region would remain a largely autonomous state within the Indian union, with India managing its foreign affairs, defense, and telecommunication. The Indian military entered the region soon after, and the tribal raid spiraled into the first of two wars between India and Pakistan over Kashmir. The war ended in 1948 with a United Nations brokered ceasefire. (AP Photo/Max Desfor, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: For 69 years, Kashmir is torn by deadly strife

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — When news spread that Indian troops had killed 22-year-old Burhan Wani, a charismatic commander of Indian-controlled Kashmir’s biggest rebel group on July 8, the public response was spontaneous and unprecedented. Tens of thousands of angry youths poured out of their homes in towns and villages across the Himalayan region, hurling rocks and bricks and clashing with Indian troops.

  • An Indian Paramilitary soldier stops a Kashmiri Muslim man in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir, Friday, July 22, 2016. Restrictions and security lockdowns are nothing new for Kashmiris. The region witnessed months of clampdown during massive public uprisings against Indian rule in 2008 and 2010. Frequent separatist calls for shutdown and protests too are routinely met with security lockdowns. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

    Kashmir residents struggle under India security lockdown

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — Sheikh Naseer Ahmed is getting married, yet his home looks like anyone else’s. There are no floral or light decorations, no hustle and bustle. Only close relatives are invited to the modest meal that is being prepared.

  • People walk in Kizilay Square with a poster of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the background in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers declared a three-month state of emergency Thursday, overwhelmingly approving President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's request for sweeping new powers to expand a crackdown in the aftermath of last week's coup. Parliament voted 346-115 to approve the national state of emergency, which will give Erdogan the authority to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees that have the force of law without parliamentary approval, among other powers.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

    Analysis: Is Turkish leader transforming a nation?

    ISTANBUL (AP) — The stunning sweep of Turkey’s crackdown following an attempted coup last week forces questions about how far President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will go in a tense, conspiracy-fueled country. While the purges may be designed to derail any future insurrections, there are increasing concerns that Erdogan is seizing the moment to transform Turkey, steering it from its secular roots toward a more pious Muslim model and cementing personal power at the expense of democratic ideals.

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • Flowers are placed in tribute to the 84 victims of a deadly truck attack where people were killed on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, southern France, Monday, July 18, 2016. France is holding a national moment of silence for 84 people killed by a truck rampage in Nice, and thousands of people are massed on the waterfront promenade where Bastille Day celebrations became a killing field. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)

    Truck rampage in Nice rattles an already unsettled France

    PARIS (AP) — The Bastille Day truck attack in Nice — occurring when France was already under a heightened state of emergency — could further unnerve a country already traumatized by past extremist attacks and persuade some worried citizens simply to stay at home, some experts say.

  • A woman waves Turkish flags during a rally against the attempted coup in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup, Monday, July 18, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    The Latest: Prime minister puts Turkey death toll at 232

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the attempted military coup in Turkey (all times local):