• In this Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015, file photo, director Ava Duvernay poses for photographers on the red carpet for the film Selma at the 2015 Berlinale Film Festival in Berlin. DuVernay’s “The 13th,” a documentary about racial inequality and mass incarceration in the United States, will open the 54th New York Film Festival. The Film Society of Lincoln Center announced the selection Tuesday, July 19, 2016. It’s the first time Lincoln Center’s prestigious film festival has opened with a nonfiction film. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)

    Ava DuVernay’s racial inequality doc ‘The 13th’ to open NYFF

    NEW YORK (AP) — Ava DuVernay’s “The 13th,” a documentary about racial inequality and mass incarceration in the United States, will open the 54th New York Film Festival.

  • Sheriff Sid Gautreaux explains the shooters actions during a news conference regarding the shooting of police officers in Baton Rouge, La., Monday, July 18, 2016. Multiple police officers were killed and wounded Sunday morning in a shooting near a gas station in Baton Rouge, less than two weeks after a black man was shot and killed by police, sparking nightly protests across the city. (Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP)

    The Latest: Gov. calls attack ‘pure unadulterated evil.’

    BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (AP) — The Latest on the fatal shooting of three law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (all times local):

  • Baltimore Police Lt. Brian Rice, center, is escorted from the courthouse to a waiting car after being found not guilty on all charges related to the death of Freddy Gray, Monday, July 18, 2016, in Baltimore. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun via AP)

    Officer acquitted in Baltimore police custody death case

    BALTIMORE (AP) — A judge further hollowed out the case against six police officers charged in the death of a young black man, delivering a third consecutive acquittal and ruling once again that prosecutors failed to prove officers intentionally hurt Freddie Gray.

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks off the stage with his wife Melania during the Republican National Convention, Monday, July 18, 2016, in Cleveland. (AP Photo/John Locher)

    GOP to kick off convention; Trump to make surprise visit

    CLEVELAND (AP) — After a harsh primary, Republicans kicked off Donald Trump’s general election campaign with a warm and personal validation from his wife, Melania Trump, who emotionally assured GOP convention delegates and voters across the country that the brash candidate has the character and determination to unite a divided nation

  • In this June 21, 2016, file photo, Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., talks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Scott candidly described being stopped by police and Capitol Hill cops because of the color of his skin. It's an experience all too familiar to many of his African-American colleagues in Congress. A day after Scott’s personal recounting on the Senate floor, several lawmakers said July 14, that they have had similar experiences. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

    GOP reaches for nuance on race, police after latest unrest

    ATLANTA (AP) — Some prominent Republicans are speaking out about race, expressing empathy for the challenges faced by black Americans, after a spate of racially tinged gun violence that saw two black men killed by police and retaliatory attacks by a black sniper that killed five Dallas police officers.

  • This Nov. 8, 2013, file photo shows Cleveland's skyline and the venue of the 2016 Republican National Convention, Quicken Loans Arena, framed by the Guardians of Traffic sculptures at the east end of the Hope Memorial Bridge in Cleveland. Donald Trump's effort to unite a splintered Republican Party around his candidacy is about to take center stage in a city that is itself deeply fractured. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)

    Cleveland, a fractured city, an apt place for GOP convention

    CLEVELAND (AP) — Donald Trump’s effort to unite a splintered Republican Party around his candidacy is about to take center stage in a city that is itself deeply fractured.

  • In this Wednesday, July 6, 2016 photo, Adriano Espaillat smiles during an interview with The Associated Press in New York. In an election year filled with debate over immigration, Espaillat hopes his personal story makes its own statement. After living at one point in the country without documentation, he could become the first Dominican-American in Congress.
(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Harlem could soon have first Dominican-American in Congress

    NEW YORK (AP) — In an election year filled with debate over immigration, Adriano Espaillat hopes his personal story makes its own statement. After living at one point in the country without documentation, he could become the first Dominican-American in Congress.

  • Police officers talk with community activist Cynthia Davis in the Staten Island borough of New York, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The recent highly publicized deaths of black men in encounters with police in Minnesota, Louisiana and across the country, and now the sniper killing of five Dallas officers, have focused new attention on the chasm between police and minorities, one of so many divides in this contentious election year. Years of tension have left people wary in both the policing community and in minority neighborhoods, with many yearning for one another’s respect. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    DIVIDED AMERICA: Bridging the gap between police, policed

    NEW YORK (AP) — On an unusually cool night for summer, Mike Perry and his crew thread the sidewalks running through Staten Island’s Stapleton Houses, tracked by police cameras bolted to the apartment blocks and positioned atop poles.