• Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    The oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into New York City’s Twin Towers — are old enough to remember the relative economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton was running for president. The nation’s youngest adults — now nearing 20 themselves — find it hard to recall a reality without terrorism and economic worry.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    America’s oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center — can remember the economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton ran for president. The younger end of the generation — now nearing 20 — can’t recall a time without terrorism or economic worry.

  • In this Sunday, Oct. 11, 2015 file photo, a Palestinian woman walks by Jewish child as he lights candles where a stabbing attack took place last week in Jerusalem's Old City. A new poll of Israelis and Palestinians released on Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, found that a slim majority on both sides still favor a peace settlement establishing a Palestinian state alongside Israel, despite years of conflict and deadlock in negotiations. The results of the joint poll may provide some small signs of encouragement when peace prospects appear bleak. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty, File)

    Poll shows that most Israelis, Palestinians still seek peace

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli authorities on Monday confirmed that they have begun the process of expanding an Israeli settlement in Hebron, a West Bank city that has been the focus of nearly a year of violence.

  • Diana Downard, 26, a Bernie Sanders supporter who now says she will vote for Hillary Clinton, has drinks with friends at a pub in Denver on July 6, 2016. "Millennials have been described as apathetic, but they're absolutely not," says Downard "Millennials have a very nuanced understanding of the political world." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Divided America: Diverse millennials are no voting monolith

    America’s oldest millennials — nearing 20 when airplanes slammed into the World Trade Center — can remember the economic prosperity of the 1990s, and when a different Clinton ran for president. The younger end of the generation — now nearing 20 — can’t recall a time without terrorism or economic worry.

  • Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, joined by New York Police Department Commissioner Bill Bratton, left, and others, meets with law enforcement leaders at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    In spite of email controversy, Clinton holds edge over Trump

    NEW YORK (AP) — Hillary Clinton can’t seem to escape her use of a private email server as she runs for president. But faced with the choice of Donald Trump, voters seem willing to tolerate the questions it raises about Clinton’s honesty because of their distaste for the Republican nominee.

  • In this Jan. 24, 2013 file photo, Executive Producer Stephen Bannon poses at the premiere of "Sweetwater" during the 2013 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Republican Donald Trump is overhauling his campaign again, bringing in Breitbart News' Bannon as campaign CEO and promoting pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager. Trump told The Associated Press in a phone interview early Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016, that he has known both individuals for a long time. (Photo by Danny Moloshok/Invision/AP, File)

    Republican Donald Trump shaking up campaign

    NEW YORK (AP) — Frustrated with his troubled candidacy, Donald Trump is hinging his presidential hopes on a risky bet: that the fiery populism and freewheeling style that won him the Republican nomination give him a better shot at the White House than uniting his party and rallying moderate voters.