• This Feb. 19, 2014, file photo, shows WhatsApp and Facebook app icons on a smartphone in New York. Global messaging service WhatsApp says it will start sharing the phone numbers of its users with Facebook, its parent company. That means WhatsApp users could soon start seeing more targeted ads on Facebook, although not on the messaging service itself. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)

    WhatsApp is going to share your phone number with Facebook

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Global messaging service WhatsApp says it will start sharing the phone numbers of its users with Facebook, its parent company. That means WhatsApp users could soon start seeing more targeted ads and Facebook friend suggestions on Facebook based on WhatsApp information — although not on the messaging service itself.

  • An autonomous vehicle is parked for its test drive in Singapore Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The world’s first self-driving taxis, operated by nuTonomy, an autonomous vehicle software startup, will be picking up passengers in Singapore starting Thursday, Aug. 25. The service will start small - six cars now, growing to a dozen by the end of the year. The ultimate goal, say nuTonomy officials, is to have a fully self-driving taxi fleet in Singapore by 2018, which will help sharply cut the number of cars on Singapore’s congested roads. (AP Photo/Yong Teck Lim)

    World’s first self-driving taxis debut in Singapore

    SINGAPORE (AP) — The world’s first self-driving taxis began picking up passengers in Singapore starting Thursday.

  • Correction: Water Park-Fatality-Regulation story

    TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — In a story Aug. 12 about the regulation in Kansas for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported that South Dakota was among the states that have no laws regulating the industry. South Dakota passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • In this June 10, 2005 file photo, workers walk past a part of the Qinshan No. 2 Nuclear Power Plant, China's first self-designed and self-built national commercial nuclear power plant in Qinshan, about 125 kilometers (about 90 miles) southwest of Shanghai, China. Beijing's wants to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    China sets sights on new global export: nuclear energy

    BEIJING (AP) — On a seaside field south of Shanghai, workers are constructing a nuclear reactor that is the flagship for Beijing’s ambition to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology.

  • In this June 10, 2005 file photo, workers walk past a part of the Qinshan No. 2 Nuclear Power Plant, China's first self-designed and self-built national commercial nuclear power plant in Qinshan, about 125 kilometers (about 90 miles) southwest of Shanghai, China. Beijing's wants to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    China sets sights on new global export: nuclear energy

    BEIJING (AP) — On a seaside field south of Shanghai, workers are constructing a nuclear reactor that is the flagship for Beijing’s ambition to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology.

  • In this Friday, July 8, 2016 photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens, an epinephrine autoinjector for the treatment of allergic reactions, in Sacramento, Calif. Price hikes for the emergency medicine have made its maker, Mylan, the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    How EpiPen’s maker raised prices, and hackles, so much

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Sky-high price hikes for EpiPen, the injected emergency medicine for severe allergic reactions to foods and bug bites, have made its maker the latest target for patients and politicians infuriated by soaring drug prices.

  • In this Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015 file photo, amusement device inspector Avery Wheelock inspects the safety pins on a children's merry-go-round at the Mississippi State Fair in Jackson, Miss. In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

    Thrill-ride accidents spark new demands for regulation

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a story Aug. 22 about the lack of unified regulation for amusement park rides, The Associated Press erroneously reported which states have no laws regulating the industry. Montana was omitted from the list, which also includes Alabama, Mississippi, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. It also incorrectly included South Dakota, which passed a law requiring inspections in 2014.

  • Isaac Sanchez, 28, a driver for ride-hailing company Uber, prepares to speak at a press conference Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque, N.M., about Uber's extending the option to request Spanish-speaking drivers. The San Francisco-based Uber announced Monday the launch of uberESPANOL in New Mexico, the nation's most Hispanic state. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

    Uber expands Spanish-speaking service to New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Uber on Monday extended its option for customers to request a Spanish-speaking driver to New Mexico — the nation’s most Hispanic state by percentage of population.