• In this Tuesday, April 12, 2016 photo, Sewage flows from an outlet into the sea in front of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City. Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip's Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone. The sewage has damaged Gaza's limited fresh water supplies, decimated fishing zones, and after years of neglect, is now floating northward and affecting Israel as well, where a nearby desalination plant was forced to shut down, apparently due to pollution. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

    Gaza sewage poisons coastline, threatens Israel

    SHATI REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip’s Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone.

  • Cedar Street in the center of the village of Nickerson, Neb., is seen at night, Tuesday, April 19, 2016. When regional officials announced plans to open a $300 million chicken processing plant employing 1,100 workers, residents packed the firehall and the village board unanimously voted against the plant, and a week later the company gave up, saying they’d take their plant and jobs elsewhere. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    Tiny Nebraska town says no to 1,100 jobs, citing way of life

    NICKERSON, Neb. (AP) — Half-ton pickup trucks crowd the curb outside the One Horse Saloon, a neon Coors Light sign in the window and rib-eye steaks on the menu, but otherwise Nickerson, Nebraska, is nearly silent on a spring evening, with only rumbling freight trains interrupting bird songs.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.