• Bill ending social promotion stalls in New Mexico Senate

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A bill that calls for New Mexico third graders who don’t show proficiency in reading to be held back has stalled in a Democratic-controlled Senate committee.

  • In this Feb. 4, 2016, photo, teacher Jessica Ries passes out writing assessment tests to her fourth-grade students at Hayward Elementary School in Sioux Falls, S.D. Ries is one of many teachers working two jobs in South Dakota, a state that ranks last in teacher pay. (AP Photo/Dirk Lammers)

    Low pay forces South Dakota teachers to hold 2nd, 3rd jobs

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Jessica Ries settles in behind the counter of Tip Top Tux and phones a couple to remind them of an upcoming fitting before their wedding. In the back room, beyond the dapper mannequins and vest swatches of pink, yellow and blue, a tote filled with review packets for 24 of her Hayward Elementary School students awaits her attention if she gets any down time.

  • In this Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016 photo, a Syrian refugee boy holds up a placard in Arabic, during class at a remedial education center run by Relief International in the Zaatari Refugee Camp, near Mafraq, Jordan. UNICEF, the U.N. agency for children, estimates that more than half the refugee children in the region, or more than 700,000, are not in school. Some drop out to work and help struggling families, or because they missed too much school and can't catch up. Others are told there's no room in crowded local schools. Writing on sign in Arabic reads: Giraffe. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Scholarships, tutoring to save ‘lost generation’ of Syrians

    ZARQA, Jordan (AP) — Until recently, Syrian refugee Eyad Zoulghena only had bad options.

  • Precinct captain for Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, John Grouse explains the caucus process before caucusing begins in Nevada, Iowa, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    AP PHOTOS: Iowans gather to caucus, make pick for president

    NEVADA, Iowa (AP) — At hundreds of fire stations, high school gyms, church basements, American Legion halls and even a few private homes, Iowans gathered Monday night for the state’s famed caucuses — the first step toward picking a new U.S. president.