• In this May 5, 2016 file photo Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures during a rally in Charleston, W.Va. Trump's apparent lock on the Republican presidential nomination means advocates of large-scale transfers of federal lands to states in the West likely won't find support in the White House regardless of who wins election this November. Advisers and the candidates' prior statements indicate neither Trump nor Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders favor the wholesale transfers of federal lands. (AP Photo/Steve Helber,File)

    Trump sweep of GOP field deflates federal land transfer push

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Donald Trump’s apparent lock on the Republican presidential nomination means advocates of large-scale transfers of federal lands to states in the West likely won’t find support in the White House regardless of who wins election this November.

  • Sadiq Khan, Labour Party candidate, arrives on the podium to hear the results of the London mayoral elections, at City Hall in London, Saturday, May 7, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

    Voters punish the Labour Party in Scotland

    LONDON (AP) — Sadiq Khan became London’s first Muslim mayor Saturday, as voters rejected attempts to taint him with links to extremism and handed a decisive victory to the bus driver’s son from south London.

    Updated: 6:03 pm

  • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un addresses the congress in Pyongyang, North Korea, Friday May 6, 2016. North Korea on Friday opened the first full congress of its ruling party since 1980, a major political event intended to showcase the country's stability and unity under young leader Kim Jong Un despite international criticism and tough new sanctions over the North's recent nuclear test and a slew of missile launches. (KRT via AP) NORTH KOREA OUT

    Behind closed doors, North Korea opens ruling party congress

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un hailed his country’s recent nuclear test to uproarious applause as he convened the first full congress of its ruling party since 1980, an event intended to showcase the North’s stability and unity in the face of tough international sanctions and deepening isolation.

    Updated: 9:41 am

  • Scotland’s independence party scores well but no majority

    GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — The pro-independence Scottish National Party Friday secured another term in government with an historic third consecutive victory in Scotland’s parliamentary elections but fell short of an outright majority.

  • In this Nov. 3, 2015 file photo, wind turbines dot the landscape near Steele City, Neb. Wind turbines and solar panels accounted for more than two-thirds of all new electric generation capacity added to the nation’s grid in 2015, according to a recent analysis by the U.S. Department of Energy. The remaining third was largely new power plants fueled by natural gas, which has become cheap and plentiful as a result of hydraulic fracturing. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

    GOP states benefiting from shift to wind and solar energy

    WASHINGTON (AP) — If there’s a War on Coal, it’s increasingly clear which side is winning.

  • State Rep. Patricia Roybal Caballero, D-Albuquerque, speaks at a press conference by the Democratic Party of New Mexico in downtown Albuquerque, N.M. to denounce the likely GOP presidential nomination of Donald Trump, Thursday May 5, 2016. Caballero and other New Mexico Democrats said Trump's rhetoric around immigration was hurtful to the state and the country.(AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

    In New Mexico, Democrats and GOP scrutinize Trump

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Leading Democrats in New Mexico are taking aim at Donald Trump as the state’s Republican governor withholds her full endorsement of the presumptive GOP nominee.

  • A North Korean man walks out of an underpass while seen framed by the Workers' Party flags, in front of the April 25 House of Culture, the venue for the 7th Congress of the Workers' Party of Korea on Friday, May 6, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea has been duly spruced up, the masses prepped for their rallies and leader Kim Jong Un appears to be set to take center stage Friday when North Korea pulls back the curtain on what promises to be the country's biggest political show in years, if not decades: the first full congress of its ruling party since 1980. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    North Korea readies for its biggest political show in years

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — North Korea on Friday opened the first full congress of its ruling party since 1980, a major political event intended to showcase the country’s stability and unity under young leader Kim Jong Un despite international criticism and tough new sanctions over the North’s recent nuclear test and a slew of missile launches.

  • In this July 30, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves after speaking at a rally with registered nurses and other community leaders celebrate the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid, on Capitol Hill Washington. With the Obama administration counting down its final year, many Democrats are finding less to like about the president’s health care law, unsure about its place among their party’s achievements. Sanders’ call for “Medicare for all” seems to have rekindled aspirations for bigger changes beyond “Obamacare.” That poses a challenge for Hillary Clinton, who’s argued that the health care law is working and the nation needs to build on it, not start over. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Fired up by Sanders, Democrats shift left on health care

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More Democrats seem to be having doubts about the federal health care law, a contentious issue for most of President Barack Obama’s tenure and one of the defining elements of his legacy.

  • In this Wednesday, April 6, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, in Bethpage, N.Y. Trump says he would create coal-mining jobs as president, and he criticizes Hillary Clinton for saying “we’re going to put a lot of coal miners” out of work. Trump, however, has yet to explain exactly how he will revitalize Appalachia’s coal industry. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

    AP FACT CHECK: Bringing coal jobs back to Appalachia

    DALLAS (AP) — Donald Trump says he would bring back lost coal-mining jobs, and he is positioning for the November election in big coal states by portraying Hillary Clinton as a job killer.

  • New Mexico governor stays mum as Trump advances

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is declining to say whether she will vote for Donald Trump now that he is the presumptive Republican nominee for president.