• Today in History

    Today in History

  • Today in History

    Today in History

  • FILE--In this Feb. 5, 2013 file photo, Graham Allison, Professor of Government at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School, listens during an event in Boston. Imagine a dream team of the nation's top historians, recruited by the White House to advise the president on major decisions. That's the idea being pitched by two Harvard University scholars who allege that many U.S. leaders know alarmingly little about history, both in their own country and in others. Campaigns for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump did not immediately say whether they support the idea. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

    Dream team of historians proposed to advise US president

    BOSTON (AP) — Imagine a dream team of the nation’s top historians, recruited by the White House to advise the president on major decisions. That’s the idea being pitched by two Harvard University scholars who say many United States leaders know alarmingly little about history, both of their own country and of others.

  • This undated photo provided by William Herron, shows Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik, left, and her fiance, David Rector, who is seeking to have his voting rights restored five years after a judge ruled that a traumatic brain injury disqualified him from casting a ballot in San Diego. As the November election neared, it looked like Rector would once again be unable to vote. Then the 66-year-old former National Public Radio producer learned about a California law that took effect Jan. 1, that makes it easier for people with developmental disabilities to keep and regain the right to vote, if they can express a desire to vote. On Tuesday, Aug. 23, Rector will seek to have his voting rights restored and advocates representing him and others who have been disqualified will file a complaint with the U.S. Justice Department asking that the state be required to notify them of the new law in time for the Nov. 8 ballot. (William Herron via AP)

    Disabled California man seeks to have voting rights restored

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — A former producer at NPR who lost his ability to walk and speak asked a judge Tuesday to restore his right to vote under a new California law that makes it easier for people with disabilities to keep that right and regain it if lost.