• Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff speaks at her own impeachment trial, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016. Fighting to save her job, Rousseff told senators on Monday that the allegations against her have no merit. "I know I will be judged, but my conscience is clear. I did not commit a crime," she told senators. Rousseff's address comes on the fourth day of the trial. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil’s Rousseff defends self ahead of Senate’s ouster vote

    BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — On what could prove to be her last day as Brazil’s president, Dilma Rousseff mounted a forceful defense of her time leading Latin America’s most populous nation, warning senators that ousting her would hurt a young democracy while defiantly promising to go down fighting in what many see as a losing battle.

  • Humberto de la Calle, fourth from left, the chief of Colombia's government negotiation team with rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, FARC, speaks during a press conference at the presidential palace in Bogota, Colombia, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016. A permanent cease-fire took effect in Colombia on Monday as a result of a peace accord for ending five decades of war between the government and the rebels group. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Permanent cease-fire takes effect in Colombia under accord

    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — A permanent cease-fire took effect in Colombia on Monday, a major step in bringing an end to 52 years of bloody combat between the government and the country’s biggest rebel group.

  • McConnell: Federal health care overhaul is ‘crashing’

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell predicted Monday that the federal health care overhaul championed by President Barack Obama is likely to undergo changes next year, regardless of who wins the White House and which party has the upper hand in Congress.

  • In this photo taken on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2016, Indira Adhikari, left, and Suman Adhikari are seen at their home in Kathmandu, Nepal. The mother and son have very little hope of getting justice for Muktinath Adhikari, who was dragged out of a classroom he was teaching, tied to a tree and riddled with bullets by alleged maoists for refusing to part with a portion of his salary to fuel their rebellion. Now the very same rebels are politicians controlling the nation's government and want everyone to forgive and forget what happened during the conflict. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

    Survivors of Nepal insurgency fear crimes will go unpunished

    KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — The image of the teacher’s body tied to a tree and riddled with bullets still haunts his son 14 years later. Communist militants allegedly dragged the Nepalese man from the class he was teaching and then killed him for refusing to give part of his salary to fund their bloody rebellion.

  • Suspended Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff reacts during her impeachment trial at the Federal Senate in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016. Rousseff's scheduled appearance during her impeachment trial is the culmination of a fight going back to late last year, when opponents in Congress presented a measure seeking to remove her from office. Her accusers say she hurt the economy with budget manipulations; she argues she did nothing wrong and is being targeted by corrupt lawmakers. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil’s Rousseff to address Senate in trial over her future

    BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — In a 14-hour session that was less electric than expected, Brazil’s suspended president proclaimed her innocence at her impeachment trial Monday, branding her vice president a “usurper,” calling the drive to oust her a “coup” and warning senators that history will judge them harshly if they oust a democratically elected leader on false charges.

    Updated: 9:43 pm

  • FILE -- In this Jan. 9, 2016 file photo, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, center, then Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi, right, then Interior Minister Mohammed al-Ghabban, left, attend a ceremony marking Police Day, in Baghdad, Iraq. Recent political upheaval has left Iraq without a minister of defense or interior as the country prepares for the operation to retake Mosul -- expected to be the most complicated yet in the fight against the Islamic State group. Al-Obeidi was abruptly dismissed by a parliamentary no-confidence vote Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016, for reasons that seem to have little to do with his performance in office. Al-Ghabban submitted his resignation in early July amid mounting anger following a massive truck bombing claimed by IS that killed more than 300 people. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim, File)

    Down another key minister, Iraq continues Mosul push

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq’s security forces continue to gear up for a long-awaited operation to retake the Islamic State-held city of Mosul. But they will be doing so without the minister of defense who has presided over most of the military’s recent successes against IS.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, file photo, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte gestures with a fist bump during his visit to the Philippine Army's Camp Mateo Capinpin at Tanay township, Rizal province east of Manila, Philippines. Since Duterte unleashed a massive anti-drug crackdown after taking office barely two months ago, nearly 2,000 suspected drug pushers and users have been killed. He has called the pope a son of a bitch, the U.S. ambassador gay, the United Nations inutile, and threatened to declare martial law if the Supreme Court meddles in his work. But, according to a survey early last month, he has the support of nearly 91 percent of Filipinos. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

    Filipinos seen backing Duterte despite rising drug killings

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — On the day he was sworn into office, President Rodrigo Duterte went to a Manila slum and exhorted residents who knew any drug addicts to “go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.”

  • FIFA ethics court wants Qatari election candidate banned

    GENEVA (AP) — A Qatari candidate for election to FIFA’s ruling council faces being banned from soccer for not telling the truth in an ethics investigation.

  • Human rights activist Ahmed Mansoor speaks to Associated Press journalists in Ajman, United Arab Emirates, on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016. Mansoor was recently targeted by spyware that can hack into Apple's iPhone handset. The company said Thursday it has updated its security. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

    Activist discovers iPhone spyware, sparking security update

    AJMAN, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The suspicious text message that appeared on Ahmed Mansoor’s iPhone promised to reveal details about torture in the United Arab Emirates’ prisons. All Mansoor had to do was click the link.

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff smiles during a rally in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. Brazil’s Senate braces for a final showdown in a trial that could overthrow President Rousseff after months of lengthy proceedings in Congress. She is accused of breaking fiscal laws, in managing the federal budget as her government ran out of resources. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil Senate starts impeachment trial of President Rousseff

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil’s Senate on Thursday began deliberating whether to permanently remove President Dilma Rousseff from office, the final step in a leadership fight that has paralyzed Congress and cast a pall over a nation in the midst of a severe recession.