• In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, brothers Montrell White, 22, left, and Edwin White, 18, visit their childhood neighborhood for a potluck organized by young civil rights activists in the Estell Village subsidized apartment complex in the Highland Hills area of Dallas. The Whites say the neighborhood has been overrun with drugs and guns since they were kids. A rag tag group of young activists in this city have tried to raise awareness about the geographical segregation and unequal access to opportunities that continue to dog this city of 1.3 million people. (AP Photo/ Emily Schmall)

    In Dallas, burgeoning movement overshadowed by shooting

    DALLAS (AP) — The leadership of the Next Generation Action Network drove all night from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, arriving in Dallas early on July 7, just hours before the start of their hastily arranged march that ended in the worst attack on law enforcement since 9/11.

    Updated: 7:30 pm

  • Intense airstrikes in Syria’s Aleppo province hit 5 clinics

    BEIRUT (AP) — Government air raids struck at least five medical facilities in the northern province of Aleppo, where violence has intensified in recent weeks amid a siege by government forces, Syrian opposition activists said Sunday.

  • In this June 25, 2016 photo, civil rights pioneer James Meredith, center, and others walk through downtown Jackson, Miss., to the state Capitol, as part of a 50th commemoration of his march from Memphis to Jackson to encourage black people to overcome a fear of violence and to encourage them to register to vote. Along the way, he was shot and wounded, causing several groups and hundreds of marchers, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., to take up the cause and help him finish the march to the Capitol. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Civil-rights marchers: US still needs to address inequality

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A half-century ago, thousands joined a march across Mississippi to challenge a system that condoned violence against black people and suppressed their rights — issues still reverberating in today’s national debates about police violence.

  • India asks 3 Chinese journalists to leave country

    NEW DELHI (AP) — India’s government has refused to renew the visas for three Chinese journalists working for China’s official Xinhua News Agency, an official said Sunday, meaning they will have to leave the country by the end of this month.

  • FILE- In this June 9, 2016 file photo, Arthur B. Johnson Jr., of Baltimore, demonstrates alone outside Baltimore's Courthouse East on the first day of the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, in Baltimore. More than a year after Freddie Gray's death, the same streets that exploded in fury and flame are calm. Despite back-to-back acquittals for officers charged in Gray's death, the physical protest movement that helped topple the careers of both the police commissioner and the mayor has dissipated, leaving activists exploring other avenues for change. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)

    Weary of protest, Baltimore activists seek change elsewhere

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Under the beating summer sun, retired steelworker Arthur B. Johnson Jr. stood outside the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore, clutching the fraying wooden handle of a homemade sign.

  • Kosovo opposition sprays paint on minister’s car

    PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Supporters of Kosovo’s main opposition political party have sprayed paint on the interior minister’s car to protest against government orders not to allow its activist from neighboring Albania to enter the country.

  • Teen protest leader Joshua Wong shouts slogans outside a magistrate's court in Hong Kong, Thursday, July 21, 2016. A Hong Kong court on Thursday found teen protest leader Wong guilty of taking part in an illegal rally that sparked massive student-led pro-democracy protests two years ago. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Hong Kong teen protest leader guilty of unlawful assembly

    HONG KONG (AP) — Three Hong Kong student leaders were convicted Thursday of leading or encouraging the massive pro-democracy street protests that unsettled the southern Chinese city two years ago.

  • In this Monday, July 18, 2016 photo, Cornell William Brooks, president and CEO of NAACP, speaks at the NAACP national convention at the Duke Energy Center in Cincinnati. The convention's theme of “Our Lives Matter, Our Votes Count” underscored the need to defend black voting rights and to get out the black vote in the first election since black turnout helped Barack Obama twice win the presidency. (Cara Owsley/The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT; NO SALES

    NAACP: Trump, Clinton need black support to win presidency

    CINCINNATI (AP) — Civil rights activists frustrated by police slayings of blacks across the nation are looking to flex their voting power to push for reforms.