• This Aug. 12, 2012, photo, taken at a research farm at the University of Nevada, Reno, and provided by the university, shows curly cup gumweed, a sticky cousin of the sunflower that is the target of research into efforts to use it to produce biofuels. UNR environmental sciences professor Glenn Miller and a team of scientists are in the second year of a four-year project funded by a $500,000 grant from the USDA. (Whip Villarreal/University of Nevada, Reno via AP)

    Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed — curly top gumweed — was growing along the road to the future.

  • Endangered bat, cacti subjects of new federal lawsuit

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Agricultural groups in New Mexico and Texas want two cacti and a rare bat thrown off the federal endangered species list.

  • Paula Swedeen, a forest policy specialist for the Washington Environmental Council, poses for a photo as she walks through forest land adjacent to Mount Rainier National Park on Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, near Ashford, Wash. The land is part of a new project of 520 acres on private timberland that allows the private nonprofit Nisqually Land Trust to sell so-called "carbon credits" to individuals and companies - including Microsoft Corp. - who are hoping to offset their carbon footprints. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Washington project ensures forest stores carbon for decades

    SEATTLE (AP) — Half a small forest still standing near Mount Rainier faced clear-cutting before an effort in Washington state saved the decades-old trees and allowed Microsoft to help finance the project to offset its carbon footprint.