• An Amorphophallus titanum begins to bloom at the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), Thursday, July 28, 2016, in New York. The rare plant releases scent during its brief 24–36-hour peak, like the smell of rotting flesh, the reason the plant is popularly known as the corpse flower. It is the first time since 1939 that the NYBG has displayed a blooming titan-arum. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

    Rare, foul-smelling ‘corpse flower’ blooms in New York City

    NEW YORK (AP) — A foul smelling plant known as the “corpse flower” is finally blooming at the New York Botanical Garden in New York City.

  • New Jets running back Matt Forte talks to the media Wednesday, July 27, 2016, at Atlantic Health Jets Training Center in Florham Park, New Jersey. (AP Photo/Dennis Waszak)

    Mum’s the word on Fitzpatrick as Jets report for camp

    FLORHAM PARK, N.J. (AP) — The first rule of Jets training camp: No talking about Ryan Fitzpatrick.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • In this Friday, July 8, 2016 photo, Grete Bader, a recent masters graduate of the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, poses among orchid populations that grow from waste left from a former iron mine in Star Lake, N.Y. Millions of orchids are now growing in a hundred-acre wetland in the Adirondack Park that developed on waste from a vast open-pit iron mine, a transformation scientists say is most impressive because it happened naturally.  (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

    Millions of orchids grow on former mine site in upstate NY

    STAR LAKE, N.Y. (AP) — Millions of orchids are now growing in a hundred-acre wetland in the Adirondack Park that developed on waste from a vast open-pit iron mine, a transformation scientists say is most impressive because it happened naturally.