• In this photo taken on Thursday, April  7, 2016, an old man fishes in a lake that connects to the nearby Techa River, near the village of Muslyumovo, Chelyabinsk region, Russia, which is polluted with radioactive waste from Mayak nuclear plant. Mayak has been responsible for at least two of the country’s biggest radioactive accidents. Worse, environmentalists say, is the facility’s decades-old record of using the Arctic-bound waters of the Techa River to dump waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, hundreds of tons of which is imported annually from neighboring nations. (AP Photo/Katherine Jacobsen)

    Russia’s nuclear nightmare flows down radioactive river

    MUSLYUMOVO, Russia (AP) — At first glance, Gilani Dambaev looks like a healthy 60-year-old man and the river flowing past his rural family home appears pristine. But Dambaev is riddled with diseases that his doctors link to a lifetime’s exposure to excessive radiation, and the Geiger counter beeps loudly as a reporter strolls down to the muddy riverbank.

  • In this photo taken on Monday, April  11, 2016, a radiation warning sign is placed near the check-point 'Maidan' of the state radiation ecology reserve inside the 30 km exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear reactor, some 370 km ( 231 miles) south-east of Minsk, Belarus. The sign is placed in two kilometres distance of Nikolai Chubenok farm. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

    AP Exclusive: Test finds Chernobyl residue in Belarus milk

    GUBAREVICHI, Belarus (AP) — On the edge of Belarus’ Chernobyl exclusion zone, down the road from the signs warning “Stop! Radiation,” a dairy farmer offers his visitors a glass of freshly drawn milk. Associated Press reporters politely decline the drink but pass on a bottled sample to a laboratory, which confirms it contains levels of a radioactive isotope at levels 10 times higher than the nation’s food safety limits.