• This photo courtesy of Richard Peterson shows Peterson posing for a portrait.  Peterson is CEO of MarketPsych, a firm that applies research from behavioral science to financial markets.  MarketPsych's computer programs attempt to gauge the market's mood by scanning news and Twitter and other social media. (Photo courtesy of Richard Peterson via AP)

    A Q&A with Wall Street’s top psychiatrist on market turmoil

    NEW YORK (AP) — When it seems like the stock market has lost its mind, big banks and investment firms often turn to one particular psychiatrist: Richard Peterson, CEO of MarketPsych, a firm that applies research from behavioral science to financial markets.

  • You can’t control much, but you can control investment fees

    NEW YORK (AP) — Do the stock market’s big swings have you feeling helpless?

  • Christmas in August: Wal-Mart’s holiday layaway comes early

    NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart is giving customers a head start on holiday shopping, launching its annual layaway program two weeks earlier than last year.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015 photo Erin Stennis poses for a photo in Los Angeles. Stennis helped a lawmaker pass legislation allowing California taxpayers to donate to colon cancer prevention after her husband died of the disease in 2003. Stennis says it's a missed opportunity that the state hasn't spent any of the  donations on cancer awareness a decade after the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

    AP EXCLUSIVE: California tax donations lost in bureaucracy

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Nearly $10 million in charitable donations by California taxpayers sat unspent in government accounts at the end of last year, The Associated Press has found, and the Senate Governance and Finance Committee chairman said Thursday that he wants a review of state accounts and will hold a hearing to find out why the money hasn’t been spent.

  • In this Aug. 13, 2015 file photo, a product expert demonstrates the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus during a presentation at Lincoln Center in New York.  The new Galaxy devices come weeks before comparable updates from Apple are expected. In a sense, if Samsung can’t beat the competition in sales, it can beat it to store shelves. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Review: New phones, tablets keep Samsung at Android helm

    NEW YORK (AP) — Samsung’s new smartphones and tablets might not offer enough to entice current iPhone and iPad users to switch, but they keep Samsung at the head of the class among Android gadget makers.

  • In this July 23, 2015 photo, Efrem Garza stands before his new home built on the lot of his previous house that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and holds a photograph taken by a friend of the remains of that house on South Seashore Avenue in Long Beach, Miss. Before the storm Garza was surrounded by houses and trees, now 10 years later, there are only two houses on that land, as few of the residents returned and rebuilt. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    On Mississippi’s shore, what Katrina erased not yet replaced

    LONG BEACH, Miss. (AP) — Between Mississippi’s seashore and the railroad tracks a little ways inland, where Hurricane Katrina all but erased a neighborhood 10 years ago, Efrem Garza and a handful of other homeowners are still resettling a frontier.

  • Trader Thomas Kay looks at screens in his booth before the opening bell, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. World stock markets plunged on Monday after China's main index sank 8.5 percent, its biggest drop since the early days of the global financial crisis, amid deepening fears over the health of the world's second-largest economy. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    As stock prices sink, ordinary Americans keep their heads up

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Even as anxious investors send stock prices plunging, many Americans are sounding a rather different note:

  • President Barack Obama, accompanied by Commander of the 89th Airlift Wing Colonel John C. Millard, walks towards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base in Md., Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, en route to Las Vegas, Nev.  where the the President will speak at the National Clean Energy Summit. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    Rooftop solar key topic at clean energy summit in Las Vegas

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — President Barack Obama brought presidential star power to tout the benefits of solar electricity in Western states during an annual green power conference Monday in Las Vegas hosted by U.S. Sen. Harry Reid.