• In this Wednesday, May 4, 2016, photo, Wei Wang poses with his wife and daughter in their Houston apartment. The Wangs and several other foreign investors had been banking on their investments in a biomedical research facility in northern Vermont to get green cards. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)

    Foreign investors in fizzled development are at wit’s end

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Foreigners who had been banking on their investments in a biomedical research facility and a hotel and rental cottage project in Vermont to get green cards are scrambling to find a backup now that the project’s developers are accused of misusing hundreds of millions of dollars in what investigators called a “massive eight-year fraud scheme.”

  • This undated photo provided by Fidelity Investments shows Douglas Simmons. Funds that hold utilities stocks have been top performers thus far in 2016 as investors sought shelter from a turbulent stock market. Simmons, who manages the Fidelity Select Utilities Portfolio (FSUTX), says that the combination of low long-term interest rates and signs of global economic weakness bode well for utilities funds. (Matthew Hakola/Fidelity Investments via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Fund manager Q&A: Utilities good bet in volatile market

    Funds that hold utilities stocks have been top performers this year as investors sought shelter from a turbulent stock market.

  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director Richard Cordray, left, and New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas, right, sit together at the Albuquerque Convention Center in Albuquerque, N.M., Thursday, May 5, 2016, before the start of a bureau meeting. he Consumer Financial Protection Bureau proposed to ban arbitration clauses, which would affect the entire financial industry and the hundreds of millions of bank accounts, credit cards and other financial services Americans use. (AP Photos/Russell Contreras)

    Want to sue your bank? Regulators push to make it easier

    NEW YORK (AP) — If government regulators get their way, it’s going to become a lot easier to sue your bank.

    Updated: 2:47 pm

  • In this Feb. 27, 2013, file photo illustration, hands type on a computer keyboard in Los Angeles. Spring is a great time to clear out your digital clutter and make sure that you're adequately protected against hackers. A personal cybersecurity clean up should involve evaluating all your passwords, updating your software and taking stock of exactly where all your personal information is stored. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

    Digital spring cleaning: 4 ‘cyber hygiene’ tips to stay safe

    NEW YORK (AP) — Spring cleaning isn’t just about tossing old furniture and torn clothing: It’s a great time to clear out your digital clutter and make sure you’re protected against hackers.

  • In this Wednesday, July 29, file 2015 photo, the Puerto Rican flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol as in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla said on Sunday, May 1, 2016, that negotiators for the U.S. territory’s government have failed to reach a last-minute deal to avoid a third default and that he has issued an executive order to withhold payment. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

    Q&A: Puerto Rico’s debt crisis explained

    NEW YORK (AP) — Puerto Rico’s debt crisis has reached a new level, with the island’s governor saying Puerto Rico will not pay most of its $470 million in debt payments due by Monday.

  • In this Wednesday, July 29, file 2015 photo, the Puerto Rican flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol as in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla said on Sunday, May 1, 2016, that negotiators for the U.S. territory’s government have failed to reach a last-minute deal to avoid a third default and that he has issued an executive order to withhold payment. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

    Q&A: Puerto Rico’s debt crisis explained

    NEW YORK (AP) — Puerto Rico’s debt crisis reached a new level late Sunday, when the island’s governor said Puerto Rico would not pay most of its $470 million in debt payments that are due by Monday.

  • Recalls this week: Tie-downs, folding bikes

    A line of faulty ratcheting tie-downs that can fail to hold a secured load is among this week’s recalled consumer products. Others include faulty folding bikes.

  • In this Nov. 29, 2015, file photo, travelers walk to their gates at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. Airline schedule changes aren’t always a bad thing. Savvy travelers can use them to their advantage to book the flights they want without paying expensive change fees. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

    Taking advantage of airline schedule changes to save money

    NEW YORK (AP) — Airline schedule changes are often frustrating. Suddenly a mid-morning flight shifts to one leaving before sunrise or a leisurely layover turns into a mad dash to the next gate.

  • Flying autopilot with target-date funds: Points to consider

    NEW YORK (AP) — What’s in your 401(k)? For more of us, the answer is just a single fund.

  • This file photo provided by Amazon shows Amazon's latest Kindle. The Kindle Oasis is Amazon’s sleekest, lightest e-book reader yet, and at $290, unnecessary unless you’re a die-hard reader. The Oasis, which started shipping April 25, 2016, is meant to be a luxury e-book reader, a solid, top-of-the line device, when money is no object. It is designed strictly for reading, without Facebook, streaming video and other distractions common on full-functioning tablets.  (Amazon via AP)

    Review: Kindle Oasis aims at avid readers, pricey for others

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Kindle Oasis is Amazon’s sleekest, lightest e-book reader yet — and at $290, unnecessary unless you’re a die-hard reader.